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Oil spill in Mauritius, long-term threat to coral, experts say

2020-08-25T10:01:29.785Z

The corals of Mauritius were not directly damaged by the oil spill caused by the sinking of the bulk carrier MV Wakashio, but are threatened in the long term, as well as the mangroves, Japanese experts estimated Tuesday (August 25th). Read also: Oil spill in Mauritius: a succession of errors at the origin of the disaster The MV Wakashio, operated by the Japanese company Mitsui OSK Lines, struck ...



The corals of Mauritius were not directly damaged by the oil spill caused by the sinking of the bulk carrier MV Wakashio, but are threatened in the long term, as well as the mangroves, Japanese experts estimated Tuesday (August 25th).

Read also: Oil spill in Mauritius: a succession of errors at the origin of the disaster

The MV Wakashio, operated by the Japanese company Mitsui OSK Lines, struck a reef on this island in the Indian Ocean on July 25. The wreckage broke in two three weeks later, after a race against time to pump out the fuel it still contained.

1000 tonnes of fuel oil escaped

The ship let out at least 1,000 tonnes of fuel oil from its sides, which soiled the coasts - including protected areas home to mangrove forests and endangered species - and the crystal clear waters that attracted many tourists before the coronavirus pandemic.

Read also: Oil spill in Mauritius: France sends aid

Japanese experts dispatched to the scene explained during a video conference Tuesday that they had examined a dozen underwater areas 800 meters northwest of the wreck. They did not find any damage to the seabed and their coral reefs. The longest part of the wreck, cleared of the oil and debris present, was sunk at great depth on Monday, according to the authorities, an operation which took several days. But the rest of the ship, the stern surmounted by the superstructure, remained stranded at the site of the sinking.

Japanese experts noted that tiny debris from this wreck was falling into the sea, as the whole oscillates with the waves on the reef on which the ship ran aground. " If this situation continues, it could endanger the corals and kill them, " said Noriaki Sakaguchi, an ecosystem specialist with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

Initiatives to remove particles from the bulk carrier that have fallen into the water would also risk damaging the coral, which is also damaged by the ropes of the floating barriers set up against the oil spill, he said. The only solution would therefore be to remove the remaining part of the wreckage from the reef, the Japanese experts concluded.

Oil slicks have also reached mangroves along the coast, which could kill plants in these protected areas in the coming months, they also warned. Cleaning mangroves is an extremely complicated task, as working on their very loose soils risks sinking the oil even deeper. For the moment, the clean-up work is focused on recovering algae and other plants soiled by the oil spill and washed up on the beaches.

Source: lefigaro

All news articles on 2020-08-25

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