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HR Managers Believe It Would Be Better to Work Fewer Hours Per Day Than Fewer Days Per Week

2023-12-06T17:27:54.231Z

Highlights: HR Managers Believe It Would Be Better to Work Fewer Hours Per Day Than Fewer Days Per Week. In favor, they see a better relationship between work and family life and more motivation for employees. On the other hand, higher costs and difficulty in maintaining wages.. The current scenario of political transition raises a range of doubts about how the variables of employment, wages, inflation and purchasing power will evolve in the short and medium term. The research explores the perception of experts on the issue of the working day, its benefits, its difficulties and the bills that are in force in Congress.


In favor, they see a better relationship between work and family life and more motivation for employees. On the other hand, higher costs and difficulty in maintaining wages.


The current scenario of political transition raises a range of doubts about how the variables of employment, wages, inflation and purchasing power will evolve in the short and medium term. Especially, when the next government has already warned of an imminent "adjustment" and a devaluation that, it is understood, will affect the income of workers.

Currently, Argentina has a 48-hour workweek. But there are bills in Congress presented by different blocs that seek to modify the legislation. Basically, they seek to reduce the workload of workers and propose 6 or 4 hours a day or a reduction in working days.

The proposal generates opinions in favor and others, not so much. This last position, for example, is that of businessman Carlos Slim, the richest man in Mexico, who acknowledged that he does not agree with the proposal. "I think it's better for people to work 48 hours and earn more than to work 40 hours and earn less. That is very important for the population, to have a higher income to have greater purchasing power," the businessman said recently.

On the other hand, HR specialists admit another view. According to a regional survey by the employment portal Bumeran,66% of specialists in this area in Argentina believe that it is possible to reduce the working day and maintain the same salaries. The trend was down six percentage points compared to 2022, where 72% of specialists believed it was feasible. In any case, according to experts, the most complicated thing is for it to be implemented without reducing wages.

Bumeran's study involved 644 people: 376 from Argentina, 94 from Chile, 16 from Ecuador, 20 from Panama and 138 from Peru. The research explores the perception of experts on the issue of the working day, its benefits, its difficulties and the bills that are in force in Congress.

According to the survey, Peru is the country where Human Resources specialists see it as most viable to reduce the working day and maintain the same salaries, with 73%. Chile is behind with 67%; Argentina, with 66%, Panama with 63%; and, finally, Ecuador, where only 25% believe it is feasible, explains Federico Barni, CEO of Jobint.

Although most believe it is possible to implement a reduction in working hours in Argentina, 85% of specialists do not plan to do so. Of those that do, what kind of reduction in working hours are you going to implement? 73% plan to reduce the number of hours they work per day, while 27% reduce working days to four.

In 2022, 52% intended to reduce the number of hours worked per day, up from 48% who preferred to reduce working days to 4. In other words, in 2023 there is a greater adherence to the first option by 21 percentage points.

The main benefits of reduced working hours according to experts are a better work-life balance (76%); time optimisation (61%); an increase in physical and mental rest (57%); an increase in talent motivation (56%); productivity growth (53%); a decrease in stress levels (50%); a decrease in talent turnover and resignations (43%); a reduction in leaves and absences (40%); greater disconnection (23%), and a decrease in environmental pollution (16%).

On the other hand, the difficulties that stand out are: carrying it out without reducing wages (52%); the increase in labour costs (42%); lack of time to complete tasks (31%); preserving the structure of the organization (31%); wage reductions (23 per cent); a decrease in productivity (22%); and the loss of incentive to maintain and create jobs (15%).

As for the viability of the projects that are being debated in Congress, for 47% of those surveyed, "it depends on the project"; 31% believe that "it is possible, but gradually"; 16% "do not see it as feasible" and 6% believe that "they could be implemented immediately".

NE

Source: clarin

All business articles on 2023-12-06

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