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The unthinkable success of the feminist film It Still Remains Tomorrow, at the top of the Italian box office ahead of Oppenheimer and Barbie

2024-01-07T12:45:05.645Z

Highlights: The unthinkable success of the feminist film It Still Remains Tomorrow, at the top of the Italian box office ahead of Oppenheimer and Barbie. With her first feature film, filmmaker Paola Cortellesi achieves a double feat: that of exploring the underbelly of post-war fascist and patriarchal Italy. It must be said that only a few days after the release, Italy was shaken by its 105th femicide of 22-year-old Giulia Ceccin, who was stabbed to death by her ex-partner.


With her first feature film, filmmaker Paola Cortellesi achieves a double feat: that of exploring the underbelly of post-war fascist and patriarchal Italy and placing herself at the top of the charts in her country. Released in the peninsula on October 26th, it will be discovered in...


Feminist films have been flourishing for several years, such as Portrait of a Lady on Fire, Women or even Scandal. Recently, Greta Gerwig's American film Barbie (Dr. March's Daughters), an ode to women, broke all box office records, rising to the top of the charts in all the countries where it was programmed. A success that can be explained in part by the 5-star cast of this huge production, with Margot Robbie and Ryan Gosling, as well as by the colossal budget injected into its promotion. These resources are very different from those attributed to the film Il reste encore demain, the first feature film by actress Paola Cortellesi, released in cinemas on 26 October in Italy, and which nevertheless broke all records in its country.

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Barbie and Oppenheimer, who were neck-and-neck among the highest-grossing films of the year, topped the Italian box office. The former, with $1.4 billion in worldwide box office revenues, had 4.3 million admissions on the peninsula, compared to 3.7 million for the latter. Il reste encore demain has atomised them both, with a total of 4.8 million admissions recorded in two months. An unbelievable score for a black and white film, far from a blockbuster and with a burning theme: the underbelly of the patriarchal and fascist society of post-war Italy. But when we didn't expect it, how can we explain this incredible success, or rather this feat?

" READ ALSODrugged, killed, burned: behind the Alexia Daval case, the first femicide mediated as such in France

Domestic violence

First, let's go back to the story: the film takes place in the streets of the working-class district of Testaccio in Rome, in 1946, in a sclerotic post-war Italy, where the birth of a republic is finally about to give women the right to vote. Director Paola Cortellesi goes behind and in front of the camera where she plays Delia, a poor mother who is beaten by her husband, but who is determined to catch a glimpse of her freedom, like most women in her country. Thus, the film deals with the strong sisterhood experienced during these years and the generational mutual aid between these citizens. "These heroines embody a certain feminine pride," explains the Italian daily Corriere della Sera. Rather than telling a story of rebellion and emancipation, the film looks at a story of women's subjugation and humiliation, which ignited the audience's empathy."

Indeed, it is a question of drawing a faithful portrait of the daily life of Italian women in the 1940s, subjected to domestic violence. A simple fact, filmed with coldness, without anger and without a desire to accentuate emotion and injustice, Il reste encore demain freezes a chilling reality of that time: Delia, waking up every day under the blows of her husband, before taking care of the children and leaving to work in the factory for only a few nest eggs. It's a daily life that many women still live with. "There Remains Tomorrow has struck a chord in Italian society, a raw nerve," the director told the French newspaper Le Monde. For her, there was an "urgency" to tell this story, as it echoes today's society, which is still very much plagued by patriarchy and femicide. "The film shows the older generation who are subjected to violence. But so has the news," she continued.

'I killed my girlfriend'

It must be said that only a few days after the release of the feature film, on 26 October, Italy was shaken by its 105th femicide of the year: the murder of 22-year-old Giulia Cecchettin, who was stabbed to death by her ex-partner on 12 November. His body was found a week later in a ravine while the killer, Filippo Turetta, from Padua, was arrested by police near Leipzig, Germany. At the time of his arrest, he told police: "I killed my girlfriend." In a shockwave, photos of Giulia were displayed all over the country, as long as the film There Still Remains Tomorrow continued to be displayed on the fronts of Italian cinemas. Demonstrations were also held on 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, which brought together nearly 500,000 people.

Read alsoMurder of Giulia Cecchettin: the shock wave of a femicide that lifts Italy from north to south

Italy's angry Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni also spoke out about the case. "We had all hoped for the last few days that Giulia was alive. Sadly, our greatest fears have been realized. Killed. I feel infinite sadness when I see the smiling photographs of this young girl and, with sadness, great anger." As of November 19, in the country, data from the Ministry of the Interior counted 106 women killed in 2023. 87 in the family or emotional sphere, including 55 by a partner or ex-spouse. These figures are still too alarming.

Source: lefigaro

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