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Following the tragedy in the streets: What is amniotic fluid embolism? - Walla! health

2021-06-01T14:20:48.980Z

Amniotic fluid embolism is a life-threatening and unexpected complication that can affect both the mother and the baby. Although these are rare cases, it is important to be aware of the alarming phenomenon. Here are all the details >>>



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Following the tragedy in the streets: What is amniotic fluid embolism?

Kaplan Hospital in Rehovot still does not know what caused the death of Moran Malkei Nevo in the 38th week of her pregnancy, but it is estimated that it is amniotic fluid embolism - a rare, life-threatening and unexpected complication

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  • Amniotic fluid embolism

Dr. Idan Goren

Saturday, 29 May 2021, 18:45 Updated: 19:16

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A very rare but deadly complication (Photo: surfers photos)

Moran Malki Nevo, a 38-year-old midwife from Rehovot, died last night (Saturday) after undergoing a caesarean section, during which her newborn also died.

The cause of death is not known for sure, but Kaplan Hospital in Rehovot estimates that it is an amniotic fluid embolism.



Amniotic fluid embolism is a life-threatening and unexpected complication that can affect both the mother and the baby.

It is characterized by a rapid multi-systemic collapse of the mother, and sometimes of the fetus, as a result of an allergy-like reaction to amniotic fluid entering the mother's bloodstream.

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This is a very rare but fatal complication.

The mortality rate of mothers as a result of amniotic fluid embolism is estimated at about 40 percent, and the mortality rate of the fetus reaches 65 percent.

It should be noted that death of mother and fetus is very rare.

At what stage of pregnancy may amniotic fluid embolism develop?

Amniotic fluid embolism may occur during pregnancy, usually before or shortly after birth.

It has been reported both in vaginal births and after caesarean sections.

Despite being rare, there are also reports of amniotic fluid embolism following abortion or amniocentesis.

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What are the risk factors for amniotic fluid embolism?

1. Cesarean section or instrumental birth (vacuum, forceps)



2. Rapid birth



3. Maternal age over 35



4. Invasive placenta (placenta that penetrates the uterine layers) or placental abruption



5. A woman who has had over 5 births



6. Pregnancy poisoning



7. Rupture Of the uterus



8. Multiple amniotic fluid



9. Multiple pregnancies

How to identify amniotic fluid embolism?

Amniotic fluid embolism develops very suddenly and the initial symptoms are not specific and can manifest as confusion, shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting and chills.

The later stages manifest themselves in loss of consciousness, extensive bleeding along with the formation of blood clots, leading to multi-system failure.



The treatment consists mainly of supportive care for the mother and fetus.

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Source: walla

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