The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

What happens to the brain of a doctor who has not slept for almost 30 hours? - Walla! health

2021-10-11T06:37:17.200Z

Quite a few doctors have shared in a struggle that specializes in difficult and disturbing stories about mistakes they have made due to lack of sleep. We examined why this happens and what are the long-term consequences of a sleepless life?



  • health

  • news

What happens to the brain of a doctor who has not slept for almost 30 hours?

Quite a few doctors have shared difficult and disturbing stories in recent days about mistakes they made due to lack of sleep.

We asked Dr. Liora Bergz-Pro to explain to us why this is happening and what the long-term consequences of a sleepless life are.

Tags

  • Interns' protest

  • Specialize

  • Doctors

  • tiredness

  • Sleep

Walla!

health

Monday, 11 October 2021, 09:11 Updated: 09:33

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on WhatsApp

  • Share on general

  • Share on general

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Email

0 comments

  • honey

  • Research confirms: Out of 2.5 million vaccinated - only 54 per ...

  • 21 years old with a 15 year old girl

  • Anat Harel does plank exercises

  • Bennett: Working to stop with the mass isolations in the system ...

  • Elrai Price: I do not think we will need a vaccine in every half ...

  • 100 calories

  • A man gets vaccinated against the flu

  • A story in a minute - the man who swallowed 40 knives

  • Biden: "Booster Packs Will Be Accessible and Free"

  • Soup will submit to FDA approval the new drug it has developed ...

  • A woman performs sit-ups

In the video: More than a thousand interns demonstrate in Tel Aviv (courtesy of those photographed)

The interns' struggle to shorten their shifts has escalated in recent days as 2,590 interns have submitted their resignations in response to the new outline.

Interns are required to shorten 26-hour shifts, due to the claim that it is not really possible to work or function effectively without sleep.

More on Walla!

A boy did an experiment during which he did not sleep for 11 days.

These are his results

To the full article

As part of this struggle, many doctors shared their experiences of a sleepless life, but it seems that the most disturbing story of all was that of the director of Elin Hospital, Dr. Morit Barry, who told in an exposed Facebook post that after a long shift she answered while sleeping on the phone When she woke up and came to Pegia she was horrified to see the little baby without breathing assistance, and did not remember the same phone call at all. Fortunately, the baby is fine, but this story certainly raises the question - would you like a doctor who did not sleep Will make life and death decisions about your child? About you?

To better understand this story, and similar stories, and how sleep deprivation affects our body and brain, we asked Dr. Liora Bergz-Pro what happens to our body when we are not sleeping, and how dangerous it is. Here are her answers.

How long does a person need sleep to function?

This is a question that is difficult to answer, since the need is individual for that person.

One approach claims that the same person will need sleep until spontaneous awakening.

Another approach examines a person's awake state after being awakened after a variable number of hours of sleep.

Let us not forget that the need for sleep also changes with age.

Questionnaire-based studies have indicated that most people will feel better after 7-9 hours of sleep a night.

More on Walla!

  • 6 surprising reasons you are tired all the time

  • 3 mistakes you make every morning and leave you tired throughout the day

  • The diet that will help you deal with lack of sleep

  • Loan at a cheaper interest rate than the bank: Get a loan of up to NIS 100,000 for any purpose

What is "sleep deprivation"?

Sleep deprivation occurs when sleep is insufficient for wakefulness, function and health, whether due to short sleep time (quantitative decline) or due to disturbances during sleep (quantitative decline).

Like any "disease" sleep deprivation can occur acutely (for one to two days) or chronically - a condition in which the body is deprived of sleep for a long time.

Just like a chronic illness.

Tired doctor (Photo: ShutterStock)

Has the effect of sleep deprivation been researched?

Many studies have been done on sleep deprivation in hospitals, especially on the part of the hospitalized who suffer not only from the disease but often also from the hospitalization itself, noises around them, medications, lighting and even being in an unfamiliar environment.

The harms of such sleep deprivation are many, and sometimes even fateful, regarding cures.

So what happens when doctors and treatment staff are deprived of sleep?

Studies on medical interns have shown that there are more misdiagnosis in doctors after performing a shift of 24 hours or more compared to a normal working day of the same doctor.

One interesting study indicated fewer correct diagnoses on colonoscopy when the same doctor was awakened on alert the night before.

These are mistakes that happen when the deprivation is acute, but of course increase over a longer period of sleep deprivation.



Chronic sleep deprivation can lead to fatal accidents, even at work, in the case of doctors as diagnoses and therapists, but also in the personal life of the person who has not slept, both on a psychological and physiological level.

Does sleep deprivation also affect doctors' health?

Yes.

In a state of chronic deficiency, there is apparently continuous damage to neurons, which of course leads to many other damages, from mood swings to brain dysfunction, heart disease, hormonal changes and more.

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on WhatsApp

  • Share on general

  • Share on general

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Email

0 comments

Source: walla

All life articles on 2021-10-11

You may like

News/Politics 2021-06-22T09:18:38.459Z

Trends 24h

Life/Entertain 2021-11-29T16:36:42.068Z
Life/Entertain 2021-11-29T14:06:32.976Z

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy