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The word of the week is' PLASTIC (MIND) (by Massimo Sebastiani)

2021-10-17T07:21:51.517Z

© The most mature of our readers certainly remember Gino Bramieri's advertising for Moplen plastic. And now and now? The Milanese actor, comedian and conductor in some famous Carosellis said, and he replied:  'E mo', Moplen '. It was the sixties, the roaring years of plastic, when the new material seemed (and certainly was) the solution to many problems: from glasses to handles to boxes, from baby b



The most mature of our readers certainly remember

Gino Bramieri's

advertising

for Moplen plastic.

And now and now?

The Milanese actor, comedian and conductor in some famous Carosellis said, and he replied:

 'E mo', Moplen '.

It was the sixties, the roaring years of plastic, when the new material seemed (and certainly was) the solution to many problems: from glasses to handles to boxes, from baby baths to prams and toys to discs, plastic it was the winning material for resistant, long-lasting, colorful and, last but not least, cheap objects.

Someone called it the

bronze of the twentieth century

because, just like that material that marked a new epoch after the stone age, it seemed to give a decisive turning point to the production and diffusion of goods. And it is no coincidence that the so-called

'adulthood of plastic'

accompanies, identifying it, the economic boom of the second post-war period. Its history actually began earlier, at the end of the 19th century, and passes through several stages: from xylonite to bakelite, from PVC to cellophane and nylon. But the boom, precisely, comes with isotactic polypropylene (Moplen, in fact), discovered in 1954 by the Italian

Giulio Natta,

the chemical engineer who

will win the Nobel in 1963 in co-ownership with the German Karl Ziegler

who had isolated polyethylene.

Listen to "Word of the week: plastic (mind), by Massimo Sebastiani" on Spreaker. 

The substantial characteristic of plastic - which in a certain sense has an even longer history than the one we have outlined if we think of materials such as horn or amber which are considered real natural polymers - is that of being a solid material but easily deformed; a substance capable of acquiring and retaining any form. But the word 'plastic' is also the basis of an adverb which it seems that we can no longer do without in public discourse and which does not seem to have to do with continuous modifications:

plastically

.


'In the House you can see plastically the fault that crosses the majority

'; or: '

the Afghanistan case has plastically represented an incomplete Europe

'; or again: '

a party that remains plastically divided

'; and finally:

'the Evergrande case represents a concrete opportunity for the Communist Party to plastically affirm the (new) perspective

'. There are only four examples, all taken in a single day by different newspapers in the month of September 2021, which testify to the invasion of a term which obviously must have been badly needed. As if '

plastically

' had filled a void of definition and expressiveness that obviously needed to be filled. But is it really so?


Plastic, the one against which today we must also fight a decisive war - among many others - for the protection of the environment, the one that, according to a recent report by the WWF, has a social cost of 4000 billion in a year (in 2019 for the 'entire cycle of production, consumption and disposal: as much as the GDP of Germany), the one that, at least in its disposable version, was banned after shopping bags, is so called because it derives from a Greek term,

plastikòs

. The reference verb is

plasso

, that

is,

plasm

, form

. And

plastikè Tèkne

is the art of modeling. The

plastic art

par excellence is in fact sculpture and

plastic values

'was the name of an art magazine published in Rome in 1918 in which interests and aesthetic principles of metaphysical painting converged (a painting could be said, thinking of certain paintings by De Chirico in which sculptures are in fact represented) and others European avant-gardes.


Not all plastic is harmful, it could be closed, and it is undoubtedly this '

plastic'

(the same we refer to with the expression '

plastic pose

' much more than with the expression '

plastic surgery

') to which perhaps thinks those who continually refer to the expression '

plastically

' meaning, basically, '

evidently',

 '

clearly'

. Not to mention that fashions, which also include certain idioms, are part of the way in which

our brain, the most plastic organ of all,

which according to the latest research continues to change even well beyond 20 years, learns and acts.


What remains immobile, almost perennial and difficult to dispose of, as we know, is instead the other plastic we have talked about, also celebrated by the curious name chosen by

John Lennon

and

Yoko Ono

for their

Plastic Ono Band

, a tribute, it seems, to the large PET plastic factory of the Yoko family.

In reality a case of continuous mutation, so much plastic that it was considered a virtual band, because the components were constantly changing, launched in too plastic and dizzying musical experiments between the end of the 60s and the beginning of the 70s.

Source: ansa

All life articles on 2021-10-17

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