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Kissing allowed again? Vaccine against herpes virus goes into the first round

2022-05-18T10:09:12.088Z

Kissing allowed again? Vaccine against herpes virus goes into the first round Created: 05/18/2022 11:59 am By: Juliane Gutmann Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus is common: the majority of humanity is said to carry the herpes virus for life. Not always without consequences. The good news first: An infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, EBV for short, usually has no dangerous consequences. H



Kissing allowed again?

Vaccine against herpes virus goes into the first round

Created: 05/18/2022 11:59 am

By: Juliane Gutmann

Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus is common: the majority of humanity is said to carry the herpes virus for life.

Not always without consequences.

The good news first: An infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, EBV for short, usually has no dangerous consequences.

However, as the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) further informs, late infections are associated with certain risks.

In particular, people who only become infected in adulthood are said to develop more frequently as a result of diseases.

The DZIF cites mononucleosis 

and some forms of cancer as examples.

According to estimates, around 200,000 cancer cases worldwide are due to EBV infections every year.

Multiple sclerosis is also said to be triggered by Epstein-Barr infections.

A vaccine could be the solution.

Research centers and drug manufacturers are therefore researching possible vaccine candidates that are intended to reduce or even prevent the risk of Epstein-Barr infection-based diseases.

Research on a vaccine began around 20 years ago at the Helmholtz Institute in Munich, according to the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

According to the BMBF, this could go into clinical testing in 2023.

"

We are very confident that our vaccine will very efficiently prevent the development of glandular fever and the chronic fatigue syndrome that is often associated with it,

" says Professor Wolfgang Hammerschmidt from Helmholtz Munich and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF).

Kissing: One of the most beautiful things ever.

However, pathogens such as the Epstein-Barr virus can be transmitted via saliva.

© Petra Stockhausen/Imago

Prevent diseases caused by Epstein-Barr virus through vaccination?

In the USA, researchers are already a step ahead when it comes to vaccination against the Epstein-Barr virus.

A clinical trial testing a vaccine against the Epstein-Barr virus was initiated in 2022 at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

The investigation is being led by Jessica R. Durkee-Shock of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

As part of the first phase of the vaccine study, the vaccine is to be tested for tolerability and safety.

According to the specialist portal Eurekalert, 40 volunteers between the ages of 18 and 29 are taking part in the study.

Half of them are assumed to have already been infected with EBV, the other half have not yet been infected.

Participants will receive a series of three 50-microgram injections of the experimental vaccine into the muscle of the upper arm, followed by 30 to 60 minutes of observation after each dose.

The second and third doses will be given 30 days and 180 days after the first dose, respectively, with follow-up visits between each vaccination, according to the Eurekalert information.

The study is designed for four years.

There is great hope that the study results will be positive.

Because: "A vaccine that could prevent Epstein-Barr virus infection or reduce its severity could reduce

the incidence of EBV-associated malignancies and autoimmune diseases,

" NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci is quoted as saying by Eurekalert.

(jg)

More information on the study

“Safety and Immunogenicity of an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) gp350-Ferritin Nanoparticle Vaccine in Healthy Adults With or Without EBV Infection”

Launch date

: March 29, 2022

Period of investigation

: approximately four years to July 1, 2025

Published

on the specialist portal ClinicalTrials.gov

Scope

: 40 study participants

Study leader

: Jessica R Durkee-Shock from the Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Source: merkur

All life articles on 2022-05-18

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