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Psycho tricks at Aldi, Lidl and Kaufland: How customers are manipulated when shopping

2022-05-19T12:51:08.123Z

Psycho tricks at Aldi, Lidl and Kaufland: How customers are manipulated when shopping Created: 05/19/2022, 02:48 p.m By: Daniel Hagen Supermarkets and discounters like Aldi or Kaufland are masters at manipulating their customers. It starts with the shopping trolley, which skilfully tricked us. For the customer, a supermarket or discounter simply consists of products and prices. Many are not re



Psycho tricks at Aldi, Lidl and Kaufland: How customers are manipulated when shopping

Created: 05/19/2022, 02:48 p.m

By: Daniel Hagen

Supermarkets and discounters like Aldi or Kaufland are masters at manipulating their customers.

It starts with the shopping trolley, which skilfully tricked us.

For the customer, a supermarket or discounter simply consists of products and prices.

Many are not really aware of the psychology involved in such deals.

Be it the use of mirrors, special lighting or the placement of the most expensive brands at eye level - shops like Aldi, Kaufland* and Co. simply know how to manipulate their visitors inconspicuously.

How much money you end up leaving in a branch is also determined by whether you opt for a basket or a shopping trolley.

HEIDELBERG24* reveals the nasty trick behind these.

company

Aldi

belonging

Discount retail chain

head office

meal

founder

Karl & Theo Albrecht

Sales volume

$106.3 billion (2019)

Aldi: With these tricks, customers are manipulated by shopping carts

Whether music in the store*, sweets at the checkout or the positioning of the baked goods - discounters like Aldi* have planned exactly how they can get the most out of their customers.

The shopping cart also plays a major role in this.

These are usually really big and offer a lot of space.

However, this has nothing to do with comfort, but with psychology.

If a customer puts just a few products in the cart, it will appear pretty empty.

The so-called "effort reflex" follows, in which you ask yourself the question: "Did I just come here for these few things?

There's still more to do.” And boom – the car is suddenly full of things that you didn't really want.

If you then pay for the goods at a self-service checkout, it can quickly become an “intelligence test”*.

This is how Aldi customers are tricked with shopping carts.

(symbol photo) © Roland Weihrauch/dpa

Another nasty trick of the shopping cart is the shape.

Because the floor is not straight, but has a slope to the rear.

While some customers think that this is for space optimization, the reason behind it is completely different.

The goods should slide back so far that the customer's gaze falls on the front area of ​​the trolley, which suddenly appears empty.

"As a result, we no longer consciously perceive what we have already packed - and put even more in," explains marketing expert Roger Rankel in an interview with Focus Online.

Incidentally, Aldi, Kaufland, Lidl, Edeka and Rewe are currently fighting for the 2G rules in retail to fall*.

Aldi: How to protect yourself from shopping cart manipulation

In order not to be manipulated by markets and discounters like Aldi, Lidl and Co., you should perhaps switch to a shopping basket.

Of course, it is also advisable to bring a shopping list with you so that you do not get distracted so quickly.

However, shopping carts also have an extremely useful yet little-known trick to offer.

The hook in the middle of the child seat is used to hang up the fruit bags.

These are then separated from the rest of the goods and cannot be crushed under the heavy purchases.

(ie) HEIDELBERG24 is an offer from IPPEN.MEDIA.

Source: merkur

All life articles on 2022-05-19

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