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Hashimoto: The thyroid self-destructs – diagnosis often far too late

2022-09-30T04:36:21.561Z

Hashimoto: The thyroid self-destructs – diagnosis often far too late Created: 09/30/2022, 06:30 By: Judith Brown Hashimoto's autoimmune disease is often diagnosed late. The thyroid gland has then often already destroyed itself. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease that affects about ten percent of the population, mostly women. The symptoms and complaints of chronic inflammation of



Hashimoto: The thyroid self-destructs – diagnosis often far too late

Created: 09/30/2022, 06:30

By: Judith Brown

Hashimoto's autoimmune disease is often diagnosed late.

The thyroid gland has then often already destroyed itself.

Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease that affects about ten percent of the population, mostly women.

The symptoms and complaints of chronic inflammation of the thyroid gland are diverse.

However, it is often not treated properly and recognized much too late.

The thyroid gland has then already become extremely small or even completely destroyed.

Hashimoto: The thyroid self-destructs – diagnosis often far too late

Doctors can use ultrasound to diagnose Hashimoto's syndrome.

© Science Photo Library/IMAGO

Hashimoto's syndrome is caused by a sudden defect in the immune system.

As a result, the body sees its own thyroid as a foreign body, whereupon it attacks itself.

As a result, immune cells migrate into the thyroid gland and destroy it.

The tragedy is that this process often goes unnoticed.

Patients are often not diagnosed until years later.

In most cases, the thyroid gland is then already significantly reduced or completely destroyed and can no longer release enough of the important hormones due to the self-destruction.

However, if the thyroid no longer works, this has an impact on the metabolism.

In Hashimoto's patients, it usually works more slowly and performance decreases.

The disease can manifest itself through the following symptoms, among others:

  • Weak drive, tiredness, listlessness

  • difficulty concentrating

  • Weight gain despite dietary changes

  • hair loss

  • Dry skin and brittle nails

  • Depressive moods

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Hashimoto: Chronic inflammation of the thyroid gland - diagnosis and treatment

In order to be able to diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis, general practitioners first check the TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) level in the blood.

This hormone is the control hormone of the pituitary gland, known as the pituitary gland, which plays an important role in controlling hormonal balance.

Normally, once TSH reaches the thyroid gland, it starts producing the hormone thyroxine (T4).

The body then produces triiodothyronine (T3) from it.

This own metabolically active thyroid hormone is used by organs and tissue.

However, if the thyroid produces too little hormones due to Hashimoto's, then the pituitary gland sends larger amounts of TSH to boost hormone production.

As a result, the TSH value rises - a first sign of a non-functional thyroid gland.

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If the TSH value is increased, doctors usually assume that the thyroid gland is underactive and prescribe the artificial thyroid hormone L-thyroxine.

However, Hashimoto cannot be diagnosed with the THS value alone.

In addition, it requires an antibody determination in the blood and an ultrasound sonography.

Hashimoto's patients, who are usually treated like people with hypothyroidism, often continue to suffer from symptoms such as listlessness, tiredness or depressive moods.

This article only contains general information on the respective health topic and is therefore not intended for self-diagnosis, treatment or medication.

In no way does it replace a visit to the doctor.

Unfortunately, our editors are not allowed to answer individual questions about clinical pictures.

Source: merkur

All life articles on 2022-09-30

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