The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

Hurricane "Ian" leads to destruction in Florida

2022-09-30T10:54:41.561Z

Flooded streets, damaged houses, destroyed bridges: It is still unclear how many victims Hurricane "Ian" claimed - but pictures give a first impression of the extent of the disaster.



Enlarge image

1/14

Hurricane Ian made landfall in Florida on Wednesday and swept across the state's Gulf Coast with wind speeds of up to 150 miles per hour, causing massive devastation.

Presumably there were also numerous deaths.

These aerial photos show the devastating damage in Fort Myers.

Photo: Joe Cavaretta / dpa

Enlarge image

2 / 14

Land under in Florida: "Ian" brought torrential rain, storm surges and flooding.

Two children explore the damage to a settlement near Fort Myers.

Photo: Amy Beth Bennett/AP

Enlarge image

3 / 14

In case of flooding please do not go further: A sign in the city of Kissimmee indicates the risk of drowning - a warning with high topicality.

PHOTO: JOE SKIPPER/ REUTERS

Enlarge image

4 / 14

Destruction in Fort Myers Beach: How big the extent of the disaster actually is is not yet foreseeable.

US President Joe Biden said it could be the "deadliest hurricane in Florida history."

Photo: Wilfredo Lee/AP

Enlarge image

5 / 14

Apparently there is still no relief in sight.

"We continue to experience deadly rains, catastrophic storm surges, flooded streets and homes," Biden said.

Although the street in Fort Myers was flooded, this motorist was driving his vehicle in a residential area.

Photo: RICARDO ARDUENGO / AFP

Enlarge image

6 / 14

The US civil protection agency FEMA assumes "catastrophic" damage.

The authority is preparing for the fact that thousands of families will not be able to return to their homes.

Photo: Douglas R Clifford/AP

Enlarge image

7 / 14

The storm raged across the state with great force.

This boat washed onto a street in Fort Myers.

Governor Ron DeSantis spoke of damage of "historic" proportions and flooding that only occurs "every 500 years".

Photo: RICARDO ARDUENGO / AFP

Enlarge image

8 / 14

Meanwhile, the clean-up work has begun.

Workers clear branches from trees downed by the storm in Fort Myers.

Photo: MARCO BELLO / REUTERS

Enlarge image

9/14

The effects of the hurricane were also felt in Orlando.

Among other things, air traffic was stopped in the city.

Photo: JIM WATSON / AFP

Enlarge image

10/14

Full commitment: A rescue worker is on the road in Orlando in a flooded neighborhood looking for residents who need help.

In some cases, helicopters were also used to bring people who had fled to the rooftops to safety.

Photo:

Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Enlarge image

11/14

Cut off: The bridge connecting Sanibel Island to the mainland was destroyed by "Ian".

About 6000 people live on the island.

PHOTO: SHANNON STAPLETON / REUTERS

Enlarge image

12/14

In some places, it will take years to rebuild what "Ian" destroyed, Governor DeSantis fears.

Matlacha in Lee County (photo) is one of the most severely affected regions.

Photo: Douglas R. Clifford / dpa

Enlarge image

13/14

It's not just Florida that's struggling with "Ian": A shopkeeper in St. Mary's, Georgia, has to watch helplessly as parts of the city are flooded.

Photo: Arvin Temkar/AP

Enlarge image

14 / 14

In the meantime "Ian" had weakened to a tropical storm, meanwhile it has regained strength.

The US Hurricane Center NHC has again classified it as a hurricane.

While Florida (like here in Fort Myers) is still struggling with the aftermath of the storm, South Carolina is preparing for the arrival of “Ian” – a state of emergency has already been declared for the east coast state.

Photo: RICARDO ARDUENGO / AFP

Source: spiegel

All life articles on 2022-09-30

Similar news:

You may like

Tech/Game 2022-12-31T09:21:52.175Z

Trends 24h

Life/Entertain 2023-01-29T11:01:51.332Z

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy