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Ester Expósito: "The important thing is not in social networks, and what you see in them is not real life"

2022-12-07T11:11:46.994Z

At 22, the star of the series 'Elite' and of Instagram faces new records with the horror film 'Venus' and with its filming with the Mexican Amat Escalante, pretty boy of auteur cinema



Ester Expósito always wanted to be an actress.

And she was climbing positions, doing theater and small roles in film and television, until the phenomenon of the

Elite series broke out.

From there, glory.

And social networks: 28.6 million of her followers contemplate her on Instagram.

At 22 years old, the Madrid woman handles a clear, forceful speech.

He left

Elite

—the jewel in Netflix's crown— in the third season in search of new challenges, and has chained films

(Your son, Mom or Dad

and

Rainbow)

and more series

(Someone has to die

and

Venom),

which were already pointing his career change expectations, confirmed by linking two films that open up different paths: the lovecraftian

Venús,

by Jaume Balagueró, which premiered last Friday, and the shooting in Guanajuato of

Lost In The Night,

the new work by Mexican Amat Escalante, pretty boy from Cannes.

More information

'Venus': Jaume Balagueró transfers Lovecraft's cosmic terror to his local customs

Ask.

You experienced an explosion of popularity with

Elite.

Did your uncle, the Cope journalist Ángel Expósito, give you any advice on what was coming your way?

Response.

Well no, we don't talk much about work in the family.

Or how to treat the press... I think I know how to do it.

I'm careful, I always think twice and I don't go around fooling around.

Q.

Did you ever doubt about being an actress?

R.

I doubt more about achieving my goals now, that I live from it, than before.

When you are a child, the illusion is more intact.

Innocence makes you believe that you are going to achieve what you want.

Growing up, I had overwhelming self-confidence;

I have always been very determined.

As a teenager, although I had a worse time and was very overwhelmed, suffering from anxiety about studies, I started working and I did not consider that I would not make it.

It is now when I sometimes feel a lack of confidence.

Q.

Without despising

Elite,

your film career has been more escalating, more step by step, not so explosive.

R.

Each thing opens different doors, and they have allowed me to work with Balagueró or Manolo Caro

[Someone has to die].

Elite

has helped me sometimes... and sometimes not, but I'll take care of opening those doors.

Since I can choose, and I understand the privilege that I enjoy, I care a lot about selecting each project.

Now I focus on the content of the stories and not on the packaging that surrounds them.

And if you have to spend months without doing anything, I stay.

I don't mind waiting, I'm lucky.

Deep down I have always longed for a long-term, mature career, with good jobs.

I've done tests for films that I know later didn't take me because I was in 'Elite'.

In the end, art is fighting against pigeonholing”

Q.

Is it still paying to achieve popularity with commercial series?

R.

Yes, it has always happened and also throughout the world.

In the audiovisual industry, and not only in Spain, there is a certain classism.

He really likes to pigeonhole, and that the ones made by the female characters of

indie

cinema are the same three.

The same happens with the

thriller

protagonists

or

even with commercial characters.

The producers do not consider seeing you in another way, and you have to be the one who pushes.

I have not done so many mega-commercial jobs, only

Elite,

but it has been so big that it eclipses the rest.

I have done tests for films that I know of that later they did not catch me because I had been in

Elite.

In short, the art is to fight against typecasting.

Q.

At what point did you discover that

Elite

was sweeping?

R.

Even before opening there was a lot of expectation, and our followers multiplied in networks infrequently.

In young generations, like ours, that warns you.

Of course, I felt the madness the day after the launch, on the street.

Ester Expósito, in 'Venus'.

Q.

What are the networks for?

A.

I have no idea.

Q.

Well, you should know, because of your success on Instagram.

A.

It should [laughs].

They serve me as a channel with people, through which I receive a love that I am grateful for.

And to promote projects through that speaker.

I have a love/hate relationship with the networks because they steal a lot of our time and, deep down, they are all lies.

Normal, what are you going to do in a network of photos about you and your life?

Show absolute reality, capture your essence there?

It is impossible.

The important thing is to understand what they are: a very small showcase of a part of your life.

They do not show the worst, nor probably the best of your day to day.

You have to put them in their proper place.

The important thing is not in the networks, and what you see in them is not real life.

Q.

Is it true that you like horror movies?

A.

I'm a big fan.

When I was little, when I was 6 or 7 years old, I already asked my parents, when they were

channel surfing, to put on

gore

movies ,

with killings and blood.

They amused me a lot.

Unfortunately, due to age, I couldn't share it with my friends.

Later yes, in adolescence I fulfilled the topic of going to see those films in the cinema.

Q.

Are you an only child?

A.

Yes, and I like it.

I want to be the sole and indisputable owner of the throne [laughs].

Q.

In

Venus

you have worked on the character as if he were not starring in a horror film.

R.

Yes, I always look for the essence of the character.

Here she could not fall into a "there is Ester making a horror movie".

She had to build it as if it were real, that it radiated its own life.

The script was for that.

And I thought that the public would understand that this

techno

disco go-go girl who returns to her sister's house had already experienced many things in the neighborhood.

Even to wonder if her niece was actually a daughter she had left behind.

She dilutes the vital anesthesia with which she starts to, in the end, humanize and battle.

Ester Expósito, in the movie theater of the Sony Pictures offices, in Madrid. INMA FLORES

Q.

And now, Amat Escalante.

R.

I was filming

Venus

in Madrid and I received the proposal to participate in the tests of the project.

They handed me the offprints [parts of a script] and I didn't really know what it was about.

I had to play Mexican and I decided to prepare a neutral accent.

I even sang in the test.

I am very embarrassed and it was not clear to me if I was going to do it until I finally started.

They delayed the shoot for a week so that I could arrive.

I ended up in Spain, I traveled to Mexico, to Guanajuato, I rehearsed the accent for a week with a trainer and the movie started.

Escalante is very easy, although the story is very intense.

And very different from what he did previously.

Q.

You are aware that with Escalante's cinema you go up another step, to that of the big festivals.

R.

Of course, and I greatly admire the weight that Amat has in the cinema.

I move to another place and I want to go there.

Deep down, I want variety and novelty, and these last two films I think demonstrate that.

The controversy over 'El hormiguero' should not be about Pablo Motos, but about the fact that we live in a macho society”

Q.

You have participated in the documentary series

Peace Peace Now Now

about Latin American women in armed conflicts, in the episode directed by Isabel Coixet focused on the Mexican Lydia Cacho.

R.

It is very important to me to use the loudspeaker for things that I consider important, and that young people must be reminded of.

In a globalized world, there should have been more progress in ending inequalities, especially in the feminist struggle, because the networks inform us instantly.

And that hasn't happened, it slows down reaching that goal.

Some fear losing their privileges.

The change will come from education, from what families teach at home about gender equality.

The networks, campaigns and demonstrations do not matter, if parents educate sons and daughters as before, there will be no better structures.

Let's talk about equality at home and in schools, and only then will we normalize.

Q.

A few days before the controversy over Pablo Motos, you participated in

El hormiguero

promoting

Venus.

A.

In the end, it's part of the promotion and I want people to see the movie.

I am aware of the controversy and I hope that each one draws his opinion and his conclusion.

Everything is a product of the society in which we live.

Pablo Motos represents a type of dynamic.

For decades we have not been careful about dynamics on the part of journalism, at events such as red carpets...

The anthill

is an easy place to charge against because it is iconic.

We can all lurch, and progress and improve.

With me in

El homiguero

it was correct, everything went comfortably.

I insist, this is not about Pablo Motos, but about the fact that we live in a macho society.

You have to change it from the base.

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Source: elparis

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