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"They don't need this to live": Mick Jagger won't give up his rights to his children as an inheritance

2023-09-30T20:01:05.124Z

Highlights: Mick Jagger's rights to Rolling Stones' catalog could be bequeathed to charity, he suggested in an interview with the Wall Street Journal. "My children don't need $500 million to live," said Mick Jagger, 80, who hopes the donation will do "some good in the world" The singer is also certain that the group will continue to bring royalties, a few weeks before the release, on October 20, of "Hackney Diamonds", his 24th studio album.


The Rolling Stones frontman suggested in an interview the possibility of ceding his rights to the band's songs to associations that


They will have to write off this colossal legacy. Mick Jagger's rights to the Rolling Stones' catalog could be bequeathed to charity, rather than his children, he suggested in an interview with the Wall Street Journal on September 26. "My children don't need $500 million to live," said Mick Jagger, 80, who hopes the donation will do "some good in the world."

Born to five different women, the singer's eight children - aged 52, for the eldest (Karis Jagger), and 6, for the last (Deveraux Jagger) - will however inherit part of their father's colossal fortune. This would amount to $ 300 million, according to the Wall Street Journal. The co-founder of the group is also the owner of many prestigious real estate, in London, New York, or in Touraine, where he owns a castle.

"Posthumous" tour

Mick Jagger also revealed in the same interview that the Stones did not own some of their early hits. "The industry was so nascent that it didn't have the support and the number of people who can advise you today," he told the Wall Street Journal, noting that "it still happens."

" READ ALSO Quiz: do you know Mick Jagger, the singer of the Rolling Stones, who celebrates his 80th birthday?

The singer is also certain that the group will continue to bring royalties, a few weeks before the release, on October 20, of "Hackney Diamonds", his 24th studio album. The first in eighteen years. He also mentions the possibility of the Stones performing on tour "posthumously" in the form of holograms, as the group Abba has already done.

Several artists have sold the rights to their catalog in recent years for astronomical sums, such as Bruce Springsteen ($500 million), Sting ($300 million) and David Bowie ($250 million). A possibility already swept away last year by the guitarist of the Rolling Stones, Keith Richards: "I do not know if we are ready to sell our catalog, he had then confided to CBS. We could make it last a little, put a few extra things in it. The only problem when you sell your catalog is that you give a sign of aging."

Source: leparis

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