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"Water is wet": government restrictions ridiculed by Monoprix

2020-11-24T05:07:07.084Z

The brand's poster campaign launched on Friday ironically evokes the closing of “non-essential” departments in supermarkets.



"

A commission just concluded that the water is wet, we have again the right to sell umbrellas

".

This weekend, the French walking in the aisles of Monoprix were able to discover, a bit surprised, the new poster campaign of the sign, to say the least mocking with regard to the decisions taken by the government.

To read also: Employment, trade, taxes ... are the criticisms against Amazon justified?

During this second confinement, businesses deemed "

non-essential

" were forced to close.

And after a few days of vagueness concerning the rules to be applied in supermarkets at the beginning of November, the executive had finally clarified its health policy by also closing entire shelves of stores.

Then some, such as children's clothing or underwear, were finally able to reopen.

Conceived with the advertising agency DDBParis and launched last Friday, the campaign of the Casino sign thus ironizes the government's choices between products deemed "

essential

" and those which are not.

The Monoprix poster campaign.

Monoprix

A dozen signs displaying messages such as: “

Clothing for children up to three years old is essential again.

The others are asked to stop growing

”or“

If the bottles were not necessary, we had to be warned not to make babies during the first confinement

”, are now visible in most of the stores of the brand. downtown.

The American e-commerce giant Amazon does not escape the subtle spikes of Monoprix either: with reference to "

Amazon lockers

" (lockers reserved for Amazon where customers who wish can receive their packages), is displayed:

" We didn't really want to receive here what we no longer have the right to sell ”

.

Bring lightness and humor

Monoprix's punchy little phrases have provoked many reactions on social media.

Through this new marketing campaign, Internet users saw in it an intention to ridicule certain choices of the government's health policy.

And they also had a good laugh.

With BFM Business, Monoprix defended itself against any political intention.

"

The group wanted to bring a little lightness and humor in this gloomy period by making its customers smile, echoing what they can sometimes feel," said a spokesperson for the distributor.

These witticisms in no way constitute a desire to criticize government decisions that we scrupulously apply.

This tone and this humor have always been part of Monoprix's DNA

, ”added the spokesperson.

Source: lefigaro

All news articles on 2020-11-24

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