The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

"It's a taboo": Corona patients with a migration background - statement by RKI boss Wieler lets you look deeply

2021-03-03T11:01:27.403Z

Due to the language barriers of some people in Germany, the Corona policy cannot reach the entire population. This is currently evident in the intensive care unit.



Due to the language barriers of some people in Germany, the Corona policy cannot reach the entire population.

This is currently evident in the intensive care unit.

Munich - Seldom has federal and health policy been put to the test as much as it is now.

Every single person in Germany is significantly affected by the resolutions and requirements of the highest decision-makers in the country.

For about twelve months now, urgent attempts have been made to protect people from the corona virus.

Lockdown, shutdown, relaxation, vaccinations, measures - all of these issues influence the everyday life of citizens.

But do they get everywhere?

As the "Bild" claims to have learned from a conversation between Prof. Lothar Wieler, the head of the Robert Koch Institute, and some chief physicians, there are many patients with a migration background in the intensive care units of the hospitals.

You would worry that language barriers would lead to higher contagion rates.

Accordingly, these people would not be reached by politics.

Coronavirus in Germany: "Patients with communication barriers" are RKI boss Wieler's concern

Numbers relating to this topic have already been determined through a telephone survey among chief physicians.

“According to my survey, over 90 percent of intubated, seriously ill patients always had a migration background.

We have agreed internally that we want to refer to such patients as “patients with a communication barrier”, ”said Thomas Voshaar, head of the lung clinic at the Bethanien Hospital in Moers.

This finding should not have been new to Wieler.

On the contrary, he has already tried to bring this topic to the politicians around Federal Health Minister Jens Spahn.

“I heard that too.

But it's a taboo.

I tried to reach out to certain people.

We must address this religious group through imams.

The whole thing has huge implications for Berlin.

That's a real problem. "

Coronavirus: Jens Spahn has apparently been informed for a long time

The RKI boss suggested that the sensitive topic of social work should be brought into the mosques and “parallel societies in the middle of our country”.

But you couldn't get in there.

“This group consists of four million people in Germany.

This corresponds to a share of 4.8 percent.

In the intensive care units, however, well over 50 percent are from this group. "

It is unclear why the issue is not taken up by politicians.

The

picture

speculates that nobody within the federal government wants to take up the issue because they are afraid of a racism debate.

Apparently Voshaar also has this impression.

"Everyone I spoke to, up to Mr. Spahn, said: OGottoGottoGott." He made this statement during the switch with the chief physicians.

When asked by the newspaper, Lothar Wieler stated: "It was not a public discussion with experts, but a personal, informal exchange." Only considerations - no "conclusive statements" were made.

(ta)

List of rubric lists: © Florian Gaertner / photothek.net v

Source: merkur

All news articles on 2021-03-03

Similar news:

You may like

Trends 24h

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy