The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

Where is the Zue

2021-04-13T16:25:53.625Z

Why the corona emergency brake won't be enough. How Söder and Laschet act. Which is why the one-time vaccination with Johnson & Johnson does not work at first. And where Prince Philip is worshiped as a demigod. That is the situation on Tuesday evening.



1.

Braking distances

At some point the fashion came up to give laws

cute names

: The good daycare law sounded like wooden toys, brightly colored anoraks and wax crayons;

it sounded like daycare centers in Til Schweiger films.

For the “Fourth Law to Protect the Population in the Event of an Epidemic of National Scope”, the bumpy name

“Emergency Brake Act”

has become commonplace.

The cabinet launched it today, the Chancellor announced:

"The nationwide emergency brake is overdue."

Enlarge image

Federal Chancellery in Berlin

Photo: Michael Kappeler / dpa

Merkel's emergency brake law is supposed to oblige the countries to keep their promises of March 3rd (!).

If the number of infections is high, it also provides for nightly curfews - and a debate is raging about this point, in which some choose the rhetorical means of playing stupid: Why forbid someone to go out if you are more likely to get infected inside ?, they ask.

The curfew is intended to prevent people from meeting for dinner parties, Netflix evenings, and Skat rounds without having to check private apartments.

France, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Greece - tens of countries took up the measure.

"Of course, exit restrictions are annoying because anyone who just wants to stretch their feet will be hit," says my colleague Christoph Seidler from our science department.

“But the point is to keep people from meeting friends and acquaintances where they could transmit the virus.

And this is where this instrument, so the researchers say, can definitely bring something. "

The emergency brake will probably not work quickly anyway, the necessary two-thirds majority in the Bundestag is missing for an urgent procedure, as only the Greens show willingness to agree.

And if it takes hold, the train will probably have derailed in order to irritate the language image.

"It will take more measures than those agreed in the law to get the infection process under control," says Christoph.

“Immediately.

Vaccinations and higher temperatures alone will not be enough. «Perhaps we will soon need a Zue-Kita law, even if it is not called that?

  • Read the full story here: More need than brakes

2.

The one-shot setback

Hundreds of thousands of doses should have been delivered in the coming weeks: The US pharmaceutical company

Johnson & Johnson

(J&J) is postponing the delivery of its corona vaccine in Europe due to possible serious side effects.

The US health authorities had previously recommended a break in vaccinations with the preparation - because cases of blood clots in the brain also occurred here.

Enlarge image

Johnson & Johnson Empty Ampoules: Rare cases of sinus vein thrombosis between 6 and 13 days after vaccination

Photo: Michael Ciaglo / Getty Images

The vaccine was approved in the EU in mid-March, but is not yet in use here, unlike in the USA.

The EU Commission recently assumed that the active ingredient would be delivered from April 19.

In contrast to the other vaccines, only one injection is required for comprehensive protection.

  • Read the full story here: Johnson & Johnson Postpones Corona Vaccine Delivery in Europe

3.

Philip, demigod, knows

Oh, there has already been the first

funeral service for Prince Philip

.

Even before the United Kingdom officially said goodbye to the Queen's husband, residents of the volcanic island of Tanna in the Pacific thought of the deceased: They worshiped him as a demigod.

Enlarge image

Indigenous people with a picture of Prince Philip after his death: "His spirit returns"

Photo: 

DAN MCGARRY / AFP

The Philip cult goes back to a Commonwealth tour of Queen Elizabeth in 1974, during which she also toured the South Seas.

At that time, Philip in a white Navy uniform in Port Vila, the capital of Vanuatu, an island state in the South Pacific, symbolically presented a pig as a gift to emissaries from the neighboring island of Tanna.

"This started a bizarre religious connection between the British royal family and a Melanesian village that is now mourning its past saint," reports my colleague Anke Richter.

From then on, the locals celebrated Philips' birthday with fantasy uniforms and a Union Jack.

They hoped for his blessing for the banana harvest.

Years later he found out about it and sent a signed portrait.

The villagers reciprocated with a nal-nal, the club used to hunt pigs.

Yesterday dozens of mourners met in nakamal, the traditional meeting house;

Chiefs from the surrounding villages joined them.

The Union Jack was blowing at half mast, Philip was looking out of a picture, the sun was shining.

»There was no loud wailing«, reports Jean-Pascal Wahé from the Vanuatu Cultural Center to my colleague.

“It was very emotional, but serious.

People have been talking about the near future - about how Philips spirit will connect with their ancestors and nature after his funeral. ”It is said that he is returning to a secret mountain on Tanna.

On Saturday, however, he still has to do at the other end of the world: his family says goodbye to him at Windsor Castle.

  • Read the full story here: Demigod with a pig's club

(Would you like to receive the »Situation in the evening« conveniently by email in your inbox?

Here you can

order the daily briefing as a newsletter.)

What else is important today

  • Laschet warns of a "one-man show":

    CDU leader Armin Laschet attacked his rival Markus Söder in front of the Union faction.

    He underlined his demand that the MPs should be heard when deciding on the candidate for chancellor.

  • Another district court apparently declares the mask requirement in schools null and void:

    The decision of a Weimar judge that banned the mask requirement in two schools provoked outrage.

    Now there seems to be a similar case in Bavaria - the parallels are striking.

  • UN fears civil war in Myanmar like in Syria:

    The UN accuses the junta in Myanmar of using "merciless violence" against peaceful demonstrators.

    The international community should not make the same mistakes as in Syria.

A note on our own behalf: Republic 21

How do we want to talk to each other?

We are currently discussing this important question with our readers and experts under the heading

“Republic 21”

(more on this here).

For today, 8 p.m., my colleague Melanie Amann, the co-director of our capital city office, invited the SPD health expert Karl Lauterbach to our television studio in Berlin.

She will talk to him about the increasingly polarized public debate in the corona crisis and how this heated mood makes the search for solutions difficult.

We invited SPIEGEL subscribers to the event by e-mail, who can take part virtually and ask questions.

The tickets have already been taken this time - but if you want to attend events like this in the future and are not yet a subscriber, just give it a try (you can find test offers here).

What we recommend today at SPIEGEL +

  • Who will save the zombie deal ?:

    Donald Trump got out of the nuclear deal with Iran, negotiations are now underway on the resuscitation - overshadowed by an alleged Israeli attack.

    Who is pursuing which interests: the overview.

  • Measuring the German dream home:

    Germans love their single-family houses - even if they are considered to be space-consuming and harmful to the climate.

    But where are most of the houses?

    And how much energy do they really use?

    The comparison in numbers.

  • Before the big bang:

    In the dispute with sports director Hasan Salihamidžić, Hansi Flick may have overestimated his standing at Bayern.

    The departure of the successful coach seems almost inevitable.

    That also overlaps the game in Paris.

Which is less important today

Enlarge image

A pair in red and yellow

Photo: RONALD WITTEK / MATTEO BAZZI / EPA

  • Where the love goes field:

    Former Bundesliga referee

    Bibiana Steinhaus

    , 42, married her partner and former Premier League referee

    Howard Webb

    , 49.

    She told the “Bild”: “Unfortunately, due to the corona ordinance, Howard and I could only take this important step together.

    Not even witnesses were allowed.

    Of course there was no honeymoon either. "

Typo of the day

, now corrected: "Bilbo Baggins and his friends in Russian: A Soviet filming of› The Lord of the Rings ‹causes a stir on YouTube«

Cartoon of the day:

The candidate ... jokes in the Bundestag

Photo: Thomas Plaßmann

And tonight?

Could you start reading a book that my colleague Volker Weidermann recommends?

»The book is called› Vom Aufstieg ‹, and that's also what it's about: staying brave, recognizing happiness when it is there, saving the sun for dark days.

Helga Schubert wrote it, her 80 years of life in 29 stories. "Volker calls it the" most beautiful and encouraging book of the year so far, "and since today it has been nominated for the Leipzig Book Fair Prize.

When Schubert's mother came to the intensive care unit at 101, she said to her daughter: "We want to live a little longer."

In this sense: first get up, then lie down.

Have a nice evening,


yours Oliver Trenkamp

Here you can order the "Lage am Abend" by email.

Source: spiegel

All news articles on 2021-04-13

You may like

News/Politics 2021-04-13T16:25:53.625Z

Trends 24h

News/Politics 2021-05-05T13:55:16.193Z
News/Politics 2021-05-05T15:19:09.348Z
News/Politics 2021-05-06T01:07:11.820Z
News/Politics 2021-05-06T09:54:41.236Z

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy