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Dangerous heat wave covers USA: forest fires spread - marine animals "baked to death"

2021-07-12T08:55:23.979Z

The western US states are grappling with extremely high temperatures and forest fires. The heat wave is not over yet.



The western US states are grappling with extremely high temperatures and forest fires.

The heat wave is not over yet.

Los Angeles / Munich - The heat wave continues to rage in the USA.

It was only at the beginning of July that the Northwest of the USA and western Canada were hit by the enormous temperatures with temperatures of almost 50 degrees.

The heat had contributed to numerous deaths - and the danger is not over.

“Dangerous heat wave” continues: Extreme temperatures in the USA

The National Weather Service issued warnings for more than 30 million people at the weekend: The heat posed a major health risk for them. Almost all of California and large parts of Nevada had the highest warning level. This means that not only the elderly or the sick are at risk, but everyone. "Try to stay cool (also: cool)!" Warned the authority via Twitter. She called on people to drink enough fluids and to stay in cool rooms or in the shade.

Death Valley, California, notorious for its incredible heat, measured 53.5 degrees Celsius on Sunday.

That was minimally less than the day before.

The heat warning was extended there until Tuesday.

After 47 degrees on Saturday, Las Vegas, Nevada, recorded 45.6 degrees on Sunday.

It also got extremely hot in the two states of Utah and Arizona.

"A dangerous heat wave will hit large parts of the western United States - with record-breaking temperatures," said the US National Weather Service on Sunday.

Via Twitter, the forecast for Monday (July 12th) said: "The excessive heat will continue in parts of the West." Even at the beginning of the week, people therefore still have to be prepared for extreme heat and forest fires.

USA: Enormous heat and forest fires - plane crashes

Most recently, an extremely rare phenomenon was filmed during a fire in Northern California: a mighty fire tornado.

As the dramatic video continues to spread across social media, the U.S. is fighting the flames.

A plane crashed in Arizona on Saturday.

It was used to observe a fire.

According to the authorities, both crew members were killed.

The cause of the crash was initially unknown.

The forest fires also spread in the states of Oregon and California.

The so-called bootleg fire in Oregon also affected energy supplies to California.

+

A fire rages through Doyle, California.

© Noah Berger / dpa

California Governor Gavin Newsom had already declared a state of emergency late last week because of the effects of the fire on the energy supply and because of the extreme heat.

He had previously called on residents of the most populous US state to save electricity and water.

At the weekend, emergency rooms in the western United States reported

an increase in heat-related illnesses and deaths,

according to the

Washington Post

newspaper

.

"Baked to death": heat and drought threaten marine animals

The combination of exceptional heat and drought is believed to have killed hundreds of millions of marine animals, including starfish, according to preliminary estimates.

That comes from a report in the

New York Times

.

Several other species are threatened.

Starfish were "baked to death", wrote the newspaper, shells of mussels "gaped open as if they had been cooked".

It feels like one of "those post-apocalyptic films," marine biologist Christopher Harley told the

New York Times

.

But not only the USA is struggling with extreme weather conditions.

Europe was also threatened with a record heatwave at the weekend.

Spain expected temperatures that sounded almost unreal.

(d

pa / mbr)

Source: merkur

All news articles on 2021-07-12

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