The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

Permafrost: Siberia's "eternal frozen ground" melts

2021-07-25T04:08:58.971Z

In Sakha-Yakutia, sitting almost entirely on permafrost, the effects of global warming radically change the landscape and daily life. The degradation of the frozen layer causes the instability of the terrain and releases more greenhouse gases, accelerating climate change. In this remote Russian region starts this series of weekly reports on the footprint of heat in the world



With sure steps, Erel Struchkov dodges sand streaks and crooked bushes on the steep slope of Batagaika Crater. It has been three decades since it descended for the first time to the bottom of the great megadepression, the largest created by the thawing of permafrost on the planet. In his village, Batagai, some 50 impassable kilometers from the great hole, it was rumored that in summer, when the thick layer of snow and ice that covers everything disappears in an area of ​​Siberia that easily reaches negative 50 degrees in winter, it is At the bottom they could find prized mammoth ivory tusks and large prehistoric bones, which had been frozen for centuries and began to emerge with the thaw of that ancient soil. "You hardly need to prune your ears to feel the groan of the earth," whispers Struchkov, 35,today turned into scientific guide of the area.

The crunch is constant, almost musical.

Until the increasingly sharp and sustained heat of July makes the icy walls of the crater bubble, releasing chunks of rock and old ice slabs from their brilliant streaks, as if by a shot, enlarging the enormous scar in the earth.

Global warming has devastating consequences on the entire planet.

And the striking gap, whose permafrost floor spans up to 650,000 years - the oldest in Eurasia, according to studies - is an indicator of what is happening around the world.

And it represents the particular vulnerability of the Arctic, a territory where temperatures have soared two to three times faster than the world average over the past 30 years, says Anna Kurbatova, a professor of ecology at RUDN University.

The Batagaika crater.

N. POTAPOV

Verjoyanks, considered from the Cold Pole, registered a temperature of 38º in June of last year.

MRS

A cave excavated under the Melnikov Permafrost Institute allows scientists to study the behavior of frozen soil.

MRS

Kristina and Iván Somaev, in the portal of their apartment in Yakutsk.

MRS

In Verjoyanks there used to be a small airport, now although it maintains the status of a 'city' it only has a thousand inhabitants.

MRS

When it is almost 30 degrees on the streets of Yakutsk, inside the cave under the Melnikov Permafrost Institute it is -8 degrees.

In Churapcha, in Sakha-Yakutia, Siberia, Russia, the ground has bulged into mounds or warts as a result of the thawing of Permafrost.

N. BASHARIN - Melnikov Permafrost Institute.

It also makes visible the impact of the thawing of permafrost (which is also located in large quantities under Alaska, parts of Canada or Scandinavia) in Russia, where up to 170 varieties of that frozen soil of different temperatures, ice content and up to 1.5 kilometers of depth, cover two-thirds of the country, says Alexander Fedorov, of the Melnikov Permafrost Institute in Yakutsk. And especially in Sajá-Yakutia, a colossal region, as big as half of Europe and that if it were a country it would be the eighth in the world in extension, which is settled almost entirely on underground ice (also called permagel). A remote territory in northeastern Siberia, known for its harsh Gulag since Tsarist times and especially during Stalinism, in which today less than a million people live and whose splendid wealth in diamonds,However, gold and other natural resources do not translate into infrastructure and development for the region.

The thought, life and economy of Sakha-Yakutia, one of the coldest populated areas on the planet, have been associated for centuries with stable permafrost. "Its thawing and the phenomenon of desertification of the territory are changing society, infrastructure and agricultural structure by leaps and bounds", explains the expert Kurbatova. And also the orography of the strategic region: it causes severe floods, covers the territory of lakes and swamps, fuels the increasingly severe fires that devour its forests or unleash new and deep craters. In addition, as that frozen soil melts, bacteria and organic material frozen in it for a long time decompose and cause the release of greenhouse gases. And this, in turn, accelerates climate change. A vicious cycle.

Simulation of a flight over the Batagaika crater Images from 'Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020'.

Kevin Kay (YouTube)

For decades, the Batagaika Crater expanded by about 10 meters a year.

Since 2016, it has grown by almost 16 meters, according to a dense study by the University of Potsdam (Germany).

Today, the huge gap in the highlands of the Yana River resembles a stingray from the sky.

Or a sperm, Erel Struchkov jokes.

A giant one, with a head one kilometer wide, 2.5 kilometers long and a rough hollow of up to 100 meters.

In its depths, new streams of frozen water still expose from time to time remains of prehistoric fauna and rotting organic matter that stifles the environment and attracts bears and small predators.

The ancient permafrost of the Batagaika had already survived exceptionally warm weather events.

Even at temperatures up to 5 degrees higher than those recorded during the last 11,700 years, notes a recent report by a group of British, Russian and German geoscientists.

However, it is highly sensitive to human-induced disturbances, warn the researchers, led by Julian Murton of the University of Sussex.

Its thawing and the phenomenon of desertification of the territory is changing society, infrastructure and agricultural structure by leaps and bounds

Anna Kurbatova, Professor of Ecology at RUDN University.

The Batagaika gap was a simple, unnamed gorge in the highlands of the Yana River, until the clearing of a forest in the 1960s and the absence of shade caused the ground to warm up and caused the permafrost just to thaw. below.

The ground sank.

The inhabitants of the nearby towns and villages then called it "the collapse of the ground."

But when it began to expand and devour more land, many thought it would even drown the town of Batagai, and some dubbed the crater "the door to the underworld," the third of the universes, according to Sakha tradition and religion - one one of the largest ethnic groups in Siberia and the majority in the area - and in which the devil lives.

Permafrost continuity

Percentage of occupied surface

across the frozen land

Continuous (90-100%)

Discontinuous (50-90%)

Sporadic (10-50%)

Isolated (0-10%)

CANADA

Batagaika Crater

SAJAH-YAKUTIA

Chersky

Verkhoyansk

Norilsk

Churapcha

Yakutsk

RUSSIA

CHINA

Batagaika Crater Expansion

The thaw has caused the hollow to grow steadily.

The most accentuated occurred until 2013, but the ground continues to melt today.

August 27th

1999

500 m

2000

20th of August

2005

Crater

2010

July 23th

2013

July 16th

2021

2020

1 km

Temperature anomalies in June

Difference in 2021 with respect to the 1951-1980 average, in ºC

Average increase

+ 0.83ºC

+0.2

–0.5

+6.7

+1

+2

-2

+4

–0.2

-1

+0.5

In Europe, North Africa and Western Asia an increase of between two and four degrees has been observed

Canada

and Alaska

North Hemisphere

Crater

Batagaika

Siberia

Southwest China

Sources: NASA (Circum-Arctic Map of Permafrost

and Ground-Ice Conditions / NSIDC and Gistemp)

and SentinelHub.

CATALAN NACHO / EL PAÍS

Permafrost continuity

Percentage of surface occupied by frozen land

Continuous (90-100%)

Sporadic (10-50%)

Discontinuous (50-90%)

Isolated (0-10%)

CANADA

Batagaika Crater

SAJAH-YAKUTIA

Chersky

Verkhoyansk

Norilsk

Churapcha

Yakutsk

RUSSIA

CHINA

Batagaika Crater Expansion

The thaw has caused the hollow to grow steadily.

The most accentuated occurred until 2013, but the ground continues to melt today.

August 27th

1999

500 m

2000

20th of August

2005

Crater

2010

July 23th

2013

July 16th

2021

2020

1 km

Temperature anomalies in June

Difference in 2021 with respect to the 1951-1980 average, in ºC

Average increase

+ 0.83ºC

+0.2

–0.5

+6.7

+1

+2

-2

+4

–0.2

-1

+0.5

In Europe, North Africa and Western Asia an increase of between two and four degrees has been observed

Canada

and Alaska

North Hemisphere

Crater

Batagaika

Siberia

Southwest China

Sources: NASA (Circum-Arctic Map of Permafrost

and Ground-Ice Conditions/NSIDC y Gistemp)

y SentinelHub.

NACHO CATALÁN / EL PAÍS

Continuidad del permafrost

Porcentaje de superficie ocupada por la tierra helada

Continuo

(90-100%)

Discontinuo

(50-90%)

Esporádico

(10-50%)

Aislado

(0-10%)

CANADÁ

Océano

Atlántico

Alaska

Groenlandia

Cráter Batagaika

SAJÁ-YAKUTIA

Chersky

Verjoyansk

Norilsk

Siberia

RUSIA

Churapcha

Yakutsk

RUSIA

Cáucaso

CHINA

Meseta del

Tíbet

Himalaya

La expansión del cráter Batagaika

El deshielo ha causado el crecimiento constante de la oquedad. El más acentuado se produjo hasta 2013, pero el suelo continúa derritiéndose en la actualidad.

2000

2010

2020

1999

2005

2013

2021

27 de agosto

20 de agosto

23 de julio

16 de julio

500 m

Cráter

1 km

Anomalías de temperatura en junio

Diferencia en 2021 con respecto al promedio 1951-1980, en ºC

Canadá y

Alaska

+6,7

+4

+2

Aumento

promedio

+1

+0,83ºC

Cráter

Batagaika

Siberia

+0,5

En Europa, Norte de África y Asia occidental se ha observado un aumento de entre dos y cuatro grados

+0,2

–0,2

–0,5

Suroeste de China

–1

–2

Hemisferio norte

Fuentes: NASA (Circum-Arctic Map of Permafrost and Ground-Ice Conditions/NSIDC y Gistemp)

y SentinelHub.

NACHO CATALÁN / EL PAÍS

Continuidad del permafrost

Porcentaje de superficie ocupada por la tierra helada

Continuo

(90-100%)

Discontinuo

(50-90%)

Esporádico

(10-50%)

Aislado

(0-10%)

CANADÁ

Océano

Atlántico

Alaska

Groenlandia

Cráter Batagaika

SAJÁ-YAKUTIA

Chersky

ESPAÑA

Alpes

Verjoyansk

Norilsk

Siberia

RUSIA

Churapcha

Yakutsk

Océano

Pacífico

Cárpatos

RUSIA

Cáucaso

CHINA

Meseta del

Tíbet

Himalaya

La expansión del cráter Batagaika

El deshielo ha causado el crecimiento constante de la oquedad. El más acentuado se produjo hasta 2013, pero el suelo continúa derritiéndose en la actualidad.

2000

2010

2020

1999

2005

2013

2021

27 de agosto

20 de agosto

23 de julio

16 de julio

500 m

Cráter

1 km

Anomalías de temperatura en junio

Diferencia en 2021 con respecto al promedio 1951-1980, en ºC

Canadá y

Alaska

+6,7

+4

+2

Aumento

promedio

+1

+0,83ºC

Cráter

Batagaika

Siberia

+0,5

En Europa, Norte de África y Asia occidental se ha observado un aumento de entre dos y cuatro grados

+0,2

–0,2

–0,5

Suroeste de China

–1

–2

Hemisferio norte

Fuentes: NASA (Circum-Arctic Map of Permafrost and Ground-Ice Conditions/NSIDC y Gistemp)

y SentinelHub.

NACHO CATALÁN / EL PAÍS

En ruso, el permafrost se llama poéticamente “suelo congelado eterno”. Pero no ha sido así. Su degradación se aprecia de forma cada vez más clara en el paisaje. Y no solo en el cráter Batagaika y otras depresiones causadas por la degradación de esa capa helada. Las inundaciones provocan casi cada primavera importantes daños en innumerables y remotas aldeas. Y hace impracticable para el cultivo y el pasto ricos terrenos en los que antes había pueblos enteros y granjas de vacas o de caballos, acelerando los procesos migratorios y dejando el territorio, en el que moverse es una odisea, todavía más despoblado. En Rusia, sobre todo en Siberia, las tierras cultivables para la agricultura se han reducido a la mitad desde 1990 por la desaparición de las granjas estatales y el deterioro del terreno. En Churapcha, una ciudad conocida por su tradición de lucha libre sajá a unos 180 kilómetros de la capital regional, Yakutsk, la termoerosión es especialmente visible: ha abombado a ronchas prados enteros, que ahora parecen cubiertos de verrugas gigantes.

Allí mismo, hace casi dos décadas, en el subsuelo, una expedición arqueológica localizó varias tumbas y cadáveres congelados de entorno al año 1714. Ocho años después, el hallazgo de fragmentos del ADN de la viruela en el tejido pulmonar de una de las momias alertó a los expertos de todo el mundo, que hablaron de la “aterradora” —aunque improbable— posibilidad de la reaparición así del virus mortal.

Grietas en el reino del frío

Cueva-laboratorio del Instituto Melnikov Permafrost de Yakutsk. M.R.S.

Hasta la década de 1980, Sajá-Yakutia, denominada también como “reino del frío”, no conoció los problemas del calentamiento global, recuerda el científico Alexander Fedorov en su despacho de Yakutsk, con las paredes cubiertas de libros y mapas de la región, que comprende el 20% del territorio de Rusia. Su equipo estudia y mapea los distintos tipos de permafrost y su comportamiento. Investigan sobre el terreno pero también en las profundidades de la cueva excavada en el suelo de permafrost debajo del Instituto Melnikov. Con casi 30 grados en la calle, la temperatura 12 metros bajo el edificio es de -8º. “Estos procesos de calentamiento son muy tangibles para nosotros, la tierra se irá degradando y aquí viviremos cada vez peor. Pero si no detenemos el deshielo del permafrost el impacto negativo no solo se sentirá en la región; será enorme en todo el planeta”, advierte el experto.

Kristina e Ivan Somaev no hacen pronósticos. Subsisten al día. O más bien invierno a invierno. La casa en la que viven la pareja y sus hijos, Denis y Vika, de 10 y cuatro años, es uno de los más de un millar de edificios de Yakutsk dañados por el clima y la pérdida del permafrost, según cifras del Ayuntamiento. En la capital de la región, donde viven unas 330.000 personas, la mayoría de las edificaciones están construidas sobre pilares. Pero aun así, la degradación del permafrost, el movimiento y los contrastes de temperatura entre los inviernos gélidos y los veranos cada vez más cálidos han agrietado muchas fachadas, carreteras y aceras. En casa de los Somaev, donde la mala construcción deja pasar el frío helador en invierno, las paredes zozobran. “La Administración insiste en que todo está bien, prometen que harán reparaciones, pero tras pequeños retoques las cosas siguen igual”, se lamenta Somaev.

Kristina e Ivan Somaev junto a sus hijos Vika y Denis, en su casa de Yakutsk.M.R.S.

El riesgo para las infraestructuras de que se derrita esa capa subterránea de terreno congelado no es pequeño. En junio del año pasado, provocó el derrumbe de un tanque de combustible diésel en Norilsk, que derramó fuel en una zona protegida. Fue el mayor vertido de la historia en el Ártico: 20.000 toneladas de diésel. Tras lo ocurrido, las llamadas de alerta de especialistas y ambientalistas y una insólita reprimenda del presidente ruso, Vladímir Putin, a la empresa responsable, la Fiscalía general rusa encargó un estudio de las infraestructuras estratégicas construidas sobre territorio de permafrost y por tanto vulnerables: desde puentes hasta depósitos de combustible o centrales eléctricas. Además de innumerables edificios de viviendas. Sin embargo, mitigar el daño provocado por la degradación del hielo en las infraestructuras rusas puede sumar más de 100.000 millones de dólares para 2050, calcula Dmitri Strelevskiy, de la Universidad George Washington, en un estudio.

These warming processes are very tangible for us, the earth will gradually degrade and here we will live worse and worse

Alexander Fedorov, scientist

Nariyana Romanova recently returned to Yakutsk after spending time living in Moscow and traveling the world.

Now he teaches English.

He deeply loves his region, but is afraid of the future.

“I am 27 years old and it scares me that maybe my children, and in all probability my grandchildren, will not find things as they are now,” he laments.

It is pessimistic.

And it is not for less when these days Yakutsk resembles a dystopian movie.

The city is shrouded in an ocher cloud of toxic smoke, derived from savage forest fires that have already devoured more than 1.6 million hectares of the region's dense taiga forests.

En Yakutsk y otras partes de Sajá-Yakutia, la mayoría de los edificios se construyen sobre pilares, debido al permafrost.M.R.S.

El humo es tan denso que el aeropuerto suspendió durante un par de días los vuelos. Y las autoridades han advertido a la ciudadanía que no salga de casa debido a la contaminación atmosférica: los análisis de satélite muestran que las partículas en suspensión en el aire PM2,5, tan diminutas que pueden penetrar en el torrente sanguíneo, han aumentado más allá de los 1.000 microgramos por metro cúbico en los últimos días, es decir, más de 40 veces la pauta recomendada por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. “El Gobierno y los burócratas no tienen previsión ni plan. Y mientras los fuegos no se acerquen a las ciudades se van a mantener impasibles”, dice Romanova, que critica las llamadas de alerta de las autoridades rusas sobre la emergencia climática como “insultantemente débiles”.

En Verjoyanks, a unos 75 kilómetros del cráter Batagaika, Ayal Vasilev ironiza con que debido al cambio climático pronto se podrán cultivar allí sandías e incluso plátanos. “Los veranos son cada vez más cálidos y algunos se alegran, porque nos vamos desacostumbrando al frío y los inviernos fríos se hacen duros; pero es peligroso”, reconoce el joven de 20 años, que ha regresado a su aldea natal desde Yakutsk, donde estudiaba Pedagogía, para echar una mano a su madre, Larissa Popova, que trata de montar una casa rural para turistas.

La meteoróloga Liubov PerfilievaM.R.S.

Aunque mantiene el estatus de ciudad, Verjoyansk, que una vez tuvo un pequeño aeropuerto, apenas cuenta ahora con un millar de vecinos. En el asentamiento, que compite con otro de la región por el título de Polo Frío (el lugar habitado más gélido del mundo), se registró una temperatura de -67,8ºC en 1885, comenta Liubov Perfilieva, técnica en su ya histórica estación meteorológica. El verano pasado batió otro récord; esta vez positivo: 38 tórridos grados. Los niños se lanzaron a chapotear en el lago y Perfilieva y la otra técnica de la estación se dispusieron, como hacen cada tres horas, a medir y anotar todas las variables en esa zona ártica; incluida la temperatura del permafrost. “Ahora a unos 10 metros se registran -8º”, dice la científica tras extraer la vara medidora de temperatura de un profundo agujero en el suelo.

Las cosas han cambiado muy rápido en toda la zona, abunda el alcalde de Verjoyansk, Dulustán Kapitonov. “El año pasado, en el caluroso verano aparecieron pájaros desconocidos, con colas parecidas a loros. Y un oso polar caminó por el distrito”, recuerda el regidor, de 29 años. De hecho, en los últimos 25 años, los ornitólogos han identificado en Sajá-Yakutia 48 especies no autóctonas y raras en la región, como patos reales o golondrinas. “Los dichos populares y ‘recetas’ de nuestros antepasados ya no funcionan”, advierte. A Natalia Lapteva, conservadora del museo de Verjoyansk, que expone huesos de mamuts y bisontes y también la historia de algunos de los represaliados enviados a la zona, los rápidos cambios le generan algo de ansiedad. “Está sucediendo en todo el mundo, pero a nosotros nos afecta especialmente”, afirma.

‘Tesoros’ en el permafrost

Albert Protopopov, del departamento de estudio de la Academia de Ciencias de Sajá- Yakutia. M.R.S.

Al derretirse, el permafrost también desvela vestigios de un pasado lejanísimo, el pleistoceno. Mamuts congelados casi de una pieza, restos de bisontes, rinocerontes lanudos, leones cavernarios. Tesoros no solo para científicos de todo el mundo, que como Albert Protopopov, jefe del departamento de la Fauna Mamut de la Academia de Ciencias de Sajá-Yakutia, estudian su evolución. También para los cada vez más habituales cazadores de mamuts, que le sacan todo el jugo posible a la búsqueda de colmillos de marfil de estos animales extintos, que tienen un buen mercado sobre todo en China. Aunque estos mamíferos desaparecieron del continente siberiano hace unos 10.000 años, las autoridades de Sajá-Yakutia estiman que 500.000 toneladas de sus amarillentos colmillos todavía están enterrados en el suelo helado.

En una de las salas del departamento de investigación de la Academia, gigantescos huesos de mamuts, astas de reno y restos de rinoceronte lanudo se agolpan en las estanterías metálicas. Apenas queda un milímetro libre. Es como una cueva de tesoros paleontológicos para los científicos. Con grandes congeladores de los que el biólogo Protopopov extrae con cuidado a Esparta, una cachorra de león cavernario de hace 28.000 años. Con los ojitos cerrados, está tan bien conservada que parece un peluche sobre el mostrador del laboratorio. Fue hallada por cazadores de mamuts en 2018. No lejos de otro cachorro de león cavernario aún más antiguo, de 48.000 años, un macho al que se ha llamado Boris. “Las consecuencias del calentamiento global y la degradación del permafrost, además del hecho de que cada vez más personas buscan colmillos de mamuts, está dejándonos hallazgos de forma más frecuente”, abunda el científico. El estudio de la fauna de la edad de hielo es clave, remarca Protopopov: “No solo porque arroja cada vez más datos sobre los propios animales extintos, también porque está directamente relacionado con el cambio climático”.

La cachora de león cavernario Esparta de hace 28.000 años, en una de las instalaciones de la Academia de las Ciencias de Sajá-Yakutia.M.R.S.

Alrededor del 80% de las muestras únicas de animales del Pleistoceno y Holoceno con tejidos blandos conservados se han encontrado en Sajá-Yakutia. Entre ellos, describe orgulloso Serguéi Fedorov, director de exposiciones del Museo del Mamut de Yakutsk, un mamut hembra lanuda que había estado enterrada en el hielo durante unos 15.000 años —hasta que emergió por el deshielo del permafrost en 2012 y fue localizada por cazadores—, y que estaba tan bien conservada que incluso se pudo extraer una muestra de sangre y médula, según el informe de los investigadores. “Fue épico”, dice el científico, que participó en las pesquisas, “aunque estuve oliendo a mamut dos meses”, ríe.

Ese hallazgo, que atrajo a esa remota zona de Siberia a científicos de todo el planeta, y otros posteriores dieron mayor impulso a la secuenciación del genoma del mamut extinto y de otros animales, como los caballos originarios de Lena, también desaparecidos y de los que se han hallado ejemplares congelados con muy buena conservación. Pero también hace sobrevolar la idea de la clonación de estas especies. Fedorov cree que es aún demasiado pronto. Ve más probable los trabajos de “rediseño” del ADN del elefante asiático, el pariente evolutivo vivo más cercano, para que se asemeje al extinto mamut lanudo.

Al norte de Sajá-Yakutia, en Chersky, a orillas del río Kolimá, celebre por los oscuros Gulag soviéticos, el científico Serguéi Zimov y su hijo, Nikita, han creado una estación de investigación y han puesto en marcha un proyecto pionero para restaurar el ecosistema prehistórico. Quieren demostrar su hipótesis de que la presencia de grandes herbívoros en la tundra ártica ralentiza el deshielo del permafrost. Su experimento se llama Parque Pleistoceno, un área en la que han desplegado caballos y renos autóctonos, pero también otros animales como bueyes o yaks. Sostienen que su pisoteo compacta el suelo y lo mantiene congelado, una idea en la que abundan otros estudios, como uno de la Universidad de Yale publicado en Science en 2018. Y en ese paisaje, creen los Zimov, sentir de nuevo las pisadas de mamuts sería el colofón.

TODA LA SERIE

NORTEAMÉRICA

Próximamente...

ESPAÑA

Próximamente...

ORIENTE MEDIO

Próximamente...

ÁFRICA

Próximamente...

Puedes seguir a CLIMA Y MEDIO AMBIENTE en Facebook y Twitter, o apuntarte aquí para recibir nuestra newsletter semanal

  • Créditos
  • Coordinación: Brenda Valverde
  • Dirección de arte y diseño: Fernando Hernández
  • Maquetación: Itziar Amor
  • Infografía: Nacho Catalán
  • Edición de fotografía: Carlos Rosillo

Source: elparis

All news articles on 2021-07-25

You may like

News/Politics 2021-08-18T04:24:46.032Z
News/Politics 2021-07-28T03:13:47.154Z
Tech/Game 2021-08-02T16:06:38.768Z
News/Politics 2021-07-25T04:08:58.971Z
Tech/Game 2021-08-01T16:59:18.109Z

Trends 24h

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy