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For the first time nationwide commemoration of the abolition of slavery

2021-08-02T05:17:37.076Z

Almost 200 years after slavery ended, Canada's Prime Minister Trudeau sees discrimination against blacks anchored in politics. On a day of remembrance he reaffirmed his determination in the fight against racism.



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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau: "Today we pay tribute to people of African descent for their courage, determination and resilience in the face of the devastating effects of the transatlantic slave trade."

Photo:

PATRICK DOYLE / REUTERS

Many African-Canadian communities have long been commemorating the end of slavery in the country on August 1st.

This year the day was celebrated nationwide for the first time as "Emancipation Day" to commemorate the abolition of slavery.

"Today we pay tribute to people of African descent for their courage, determination and resilience in the face of the devastating effects of the transatlantic slave trade," said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Despite the abolition of slavery in Canada some two centuries ago, the legacy of discrimination against blacks "continues to be anchored in our institutions, policies and actions," Trudeau said.

He reaffirmed his determination to fight racism and intolerance.

On August 1, 1834, a law had come into force that ended slavery in the former British colonies, including Canada.

The Canadian House of Commons and the Senate unanimously decided in March to declare August 1st in Canada "Emancipation Day".

asc / AFP

Source: spiegel

All news articles on 2021-08-02

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