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They find a baby two-headed sea turtle

2021-08-03T17:25:00.021Z

According to experts, this two-headed turtle hatchling is the result of a genetic mutation that has been observed for years.



This is how they follow the path of the turtles from space 0:44

(CNN) -

Park volunteers patrolling a beach in South Carolina on Wednesday encountered an unexpected surprise: a two-headed sea turtle hatchling.

A group of patrollers and volunteers at Edisto Beach State Park were doing a routine inventory to check sea turtle nests when they came across the special hatchling, South Carolina State Parks said on Facebook.

The park said they dig into a turtle nest three to five days after it begins to show "signs of a major emergency."

This helps determine the success of the nest, which depends on how many eggs hatch.

They also look for live young that do not reach the sea.

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The two-headed loggerhead turtle was one of three live babies found in a nest.

"This two-headed calf is the result of a genetic mutation," said South Carolina State Parks.

"Other two-headed hatchlings have been found in South Carolina in recent years, but this is the first time the patrol team at Edisto Beach State Park has seen one."

Once the group took some photos, the three turtles were released into the ocean.

Most sea turtles hatch in the summer, although they can do so year-round, according to Sea World.

It is essential for humans not to disturb the nest, which can put the survival of the turtle hatchlings at risk.

When a turtle nest is disturbed, the hatchlings have a 25% or less chance of survival, according to Sea World.

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Source: cnnespanol

All news articles on 2021-08-03

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