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The US military admits killing civilians, including children, in an air strike in Kabul

2021-09-17T20:43:19.684Z

Washington, SANA- The US military admitted today that 10 civilians, including 7 children, were killed in a raid carried out by an American drone



Washington-Sana

Today, the US military admitted killing 10 civilians, including 7 children, in a raid carried out by a US drone on the Afghan capital, Kabul, in late August.

And the AFP news agency quoted the commander of US forces in Afghanistan before their final withdrawal, General Kenneth McKenzie, telling reporters: “It is unlikely that the car and those who were killed were linked to ISIS in Khorasan Province” or that they “posed a direct threat to American forces,” adding that these The strike that killed 10 civilians, including 7 children, “was a tragic mistake.”

McKenzie claimed that the August 29 drone strike in the Afghan capital was "aimed at preventing an imminent threat from ISIS in Khurasan Province."

It is noteworthy that the United States withdrew its forces from Afghanistan late last month after it suffered a catastrophic failure after twenty years of invading this country under the pretext of the war on terrorism.

A new report this month revealed that the United States had killed more than 22,000 civilians in attacks and air raids launched on several countries around the world since 2001 under the pretext of combating terrorism.

The report, prepared by the British “Air Wars” organization to monitor civilian damage and published by the Guardian newspaper, indicated that the US military has carried out nearly 100,000 air strikes since 2001, during which 22,679 civilians have been killed, noting that this number is likely to be much larger and reach up to 48 thousand and 308.

Source: sena

All news articles on 2021-09-17

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