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After losing everything in the Holocaust, Arieh built a life of glory in Israel. Here another disaster awaited him - Walla! news

2021-10-16T12:09:36.138Z

Arie Horesh was born in Romania, and in World War II his entire family perished. He immigrated to Eretz Israel, participated in the conquest of Eilat during the War of Independence and was one of the founders of Moshav Tal Shachar, where he ran a farm. During the Yom Kippur War, when he himself was on the southern front, he received the news of his son's fall. This week he died at the age of 91



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After losing everything in the Holocaust, Arieh built a life of glory in Israel.

Here another disaster awaited him

Arie Horesh was born in Romania, and in World War II his entire family perished.

He immigrated to Eretz Israel, participated in the conquest of Eilat during the War of Independence and was one of the founders of Moshav Tal Shachar, where he ran a farm.

During the Yom Kippur War, when he himself was on the southern front, he received the news of his son's fall.

This week he died at the age of 91

Tags

  • Transnistria

  • Rumania

  • World War II

  • The Holocaust

  • Holocaust survivors

  • Tal Shahar

  • Bereaved parents

Eli Ashkenazi

Saturday, October 16, 2021, 3:05 p.m.

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In Moshav Tal Shachar, Aryeh Horesh, one of the founders of the moshav, passed away this week.

The Moshav website states that "the story of Moshav Tal Shahar is in many ways the essence of the story of the State of Israel."

The same can be said of Horesh - a man whose personal life story treasures the upheavals that the Jewish people went through in the last century.

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The young lion Aryeh (Photo: courtesy of the family)

He was born in 1929 to David and Chaya Horesh in the city of Breichan in the region of Bessarabia, then in Romanian territory and today in Moldova - a middle son to his parents, between an older brother and a younger sister.

Britshan was a city of Jewish character and the Horesh family home was a traditional, albeit non-religious, home, and the parents themselves had a Zionist consciousness.

Apart from Russian, Romanian and Yiddish - they also spoke Hebrew.

Arieh himself studied in the mornings in mixed settings - and in the afternoon he studied in a "room", or received Hebrew lessons from a private teacher.



The Horesh family lived in a large house and enjoyed financial well-being.

The mother of the family was a housewife who took care of the education and care of the children, while the father was a farmer and grain merchant.

The family had agricultural lands outside the city where various grains were grown, and the father and cousin even had a large agricultural farm in a remote district where the whole family would spend the period of great freedom.

"Where Hell Began"

With the outbreak of World War II, family life was shaken. The eldest son was first drafted into the Red Army and killed in the war. In the autumn of 1940, the anti-Semitic "Iron Guard" party entered the Romanian government, and later the property of the Jews was confiscated - as was the farm of the Horesh family who were forced to move to the nearby town of Savan, where about 2,000 Jews lived.



In June 1941, Germany launched a war against the Soviet Union and Romania joined it. In the months leading up to the war, the town of Savannah became a concentration camp for the Romanian army, and the Jews lived under constant threat to their property and physical security. On June 20, two days before the outbreak of the war, all Jewish men, aged 16 to 60, were deported to a concentration camp in southern Romania. The rest of the Jewish residents were evacuated after the outbreak of the war to the district city, Dorohoi. On November 8, the deportation of the Jews of Dorohoi began and the refugees who lived there to Transnistria and many perished along the way.



"That's where the hell started," Arieh said.

After days of traveling by train, without food, in polluted wagons to transport animals, hundreds of passengers were taken off the train and marched several kilometers, followed by barges under beatings and curses and transported to the other side of the river - and from there Jews were taken to the Mogilev ghetto.

Many were murdered by the German police and collaborators from the Romanian police.

The family was shaken.

Grove as a child (Photo: courtesy of the family)

The Horesh family itself was transferred with others to the Scazinets concentration camp.

Living conditions in the camp were extremely difficult and many died of disease.

"The overcrowding was unbearable, it was barely possible to move. The corridors were also full. There were no toilets either. We defecated in open canals that were dug for us," said Horesh.



"Once a day we would be given a bowl of cabbage soup with three slices of dry bread," he described.

"Diseases broke out in the camp, especially typhus. Great mortality began. More and more people died every day from disease and starvation. Every day there were people whose job it was to collect the dead and bury them in a mass grave ... The camp remained almost without water and without medical care. "The dead grew day by day. As a child, it was very difficult for me to see how the dead were collected."

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A grove in the city of Dorohoi, one of the stations where his family passed during the Holocaust (Photo: courtesy of the family)

Arieh's mother and sister also died, and soon his father died as well.

"I was only 12. First my mother and Tzila died. The first time I cried after my father also died. I was left alone," he said a few years ago.



Aryeh joined three other children who were orphaned and together the four fled the camp - and after a journey of a few days through corn fields, in the cold and rain, eating unripe corn, they reached Mogilev and entered the Jewish ghetto.

"The next morning, first thing, I said, I have to find a synagogue. I want to go say 'Kaddish'. I did not know exactly why, but I remembered that my father said 'Kaddish' when my grandfather died," Aryeh said.

He began working for the Jewish Committee on the distribution of bread and various missions, and thus won daily breakfast as well as shoes and clothing.

When he contracted severe pneumonia, he received medical treatment.

Rebirth - and a heavy disaster

In March 1944, the Red Army liberated Mogilev. Arieh remembered how the Soviet soldiers were happily received and the feeling that "hell is behind us." The orphaned boy joined the Soviet soldiers and joined them on their journey to Bucharest. On the way, a senior officer informed him that he was appointing him as his translator into Romanian, and he was dressed in a soldier's uniform. When the unit arrived in Bucharest, he said goodbye to it - and decided that he had to immigrate to Eretz Israel. He was absorbed into the home of Jewish orphans, and in the summer they went to camps where emissaries from Eretz Israel prepared them for aliyah.



On October 22, 1945, the boy Arie Horesh boarded the illegal immigrant ship "Transylvania", with another 1,026 illegal immigrants, including orphans, camp survivors and partisans. "For life in the Land of Israel, this was the will of six and a half million Jews whose bodies were burned in kilns," one of the immigrants told a reporter at the Observer newspaper at the time. On October 29, his 16th birthday, the lone boy Arie Horesh disembarked from the ship to the wharf at the port of Haifa. "On this day I was reborn," he testified. The taste of orange juice bought by his older cousin, Shmuel Horesh, who was waiting for him at the port, was also etched in his memory.



After two months at the cousin's house and his family, Horesh moved to study in Kfar Haroeh. In the mornings, the boys worked on farms in the moshav and in the afternoons they studied. Religious south of Beit She'an. There, in parallel with his work in the platoon and fish farm, he also underwent military training and participated in night patrols. He moved with his friends to the south of the country and even participated in the occupation of Umm Rashrash, which is Eilat.

Aria and Malka Horesh at their wedding (Photo: courtesy of the family)

In Tirat Zvi, the kibbutz next to Sde Eliyahu, he met the soldier Malka Goldstein and fell in love. The two married and moved to Moshav Tal Shahar, which had been established shortly before. Over the years the couple had four children: my older uncle named after Arieh's father; Ofer; An animal named after the mother of a lion; And Orit.



Moshav Tal Shahar, which was established towards the end of the War of Independence as an outpost as part of the effort to prevent the secession of Jerusalem from the State of Israel, continued to deal with severe security problems and infiltration of infiltrators even after the war. The difficult situation led many families to leave - while others, including Arie and Malka Horesh, decided to hold on to the place. "I said to myself: I survived the Holocaust, I went through the war of liberation, two of my friends were killed next to me. This will be our home," Arieh said several years ago.



Since his childhood, Arieh has known the work of agriculture, and he easily integrated into the life of the moshav.

The family established a farm with a chicken coop in the center and over the years also grew apple and pear plantations, an olive grove, an artichoke field and anemones for export.

He also worked at the regional tractor station and operated the combine harvester that was harvested in the wheat fields.

"This will be our home."

Moshav Tal Shahar, 1950 (Photo: National Photo Collection, without)

The son, Ofer, said that his father was a fan of Hapoel Tel Aviv, from the time of Yaakov Khodorov, Amatzia Levkovich and Gideon Tish.

His sympathy was also passed on to his children Dudi and Ofer, with whom he would travel to games on Saturdays.

"I remember the first game that took us to see Hapoel Tel Aviv in the streets against Maccabi Sha'arim in one of Tish's last games and Shia Feigenbaum's first games," said Ofer.

Integrated easily into the life of the seat.

Grove (Photo: courtesy of the family)

After he managed to rebuild his life and establish a family, a moshav and a farm for glory, a heavy disaster befell Arie and Malka: my uncle, their eldest son, was killed in battle in the second week of the Yom Kippur War.

My uncle, an outstanding athlete and a graduate of the military boarding school at the Herzliya Gymnasium, volunteered for the paratroopers' sabotage unit and enlisted in the army 11 months before the war.

He was wounded and killed in a battle west of the Suez Canal, and is only 19 years old.

Arieh received the terrible news while enlisting himself in the reserve service on the southern front.

The bereaved mother, Malka, had a hard time coping with the heavy loss, and 14 years later died of cancer and heartburn.



Arieh was privileged to be surrounded by his three children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren who remained living in the moshav.

This week he passed away, a few weeks before his 92nd birthday.

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Source: walla

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