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Research on the extinction crisis of grouper and sea bream: severe climate change may cause the biomass of the South China Sea to fall by 93%

2021-11-03T04:30:25.555Z

Seafood is a favorite food of many people, but some studies have pointed out that climate change and excessive fishing activities have the opportunity to greatly reduce the marine life of the South China Sea. The research conducted by environmental organizations and universities has calculated that the high carbon emissions



Seafood is a favorite food of many people, but some studies have pointed out that climate change and excessive fishing activities have the opportunity to greatly reduce the marine life of the South China Sea.

Research conducted in cooperation with environmental organizations and universities estimates that under a simulation scenario of high carbon emissions and a 50% deterioration in fishing activities, the total biomass of the South China Sea is expected to plummet by 93%, and species such as shrimp and golden thread will be the most affected. Groupers and sea bream, which are common in Hong Kong's seafood market, have a better chance of facing extinction.


The study suggested that the relevant authorities should legislate to prohibit the capture of fry, such as regulating the size of fish net sieve, and directly using fish as human food, stop feeding fish to animals, and start a regional dialogue.


According to 2015 figures, 95% of Hong Kong’s seafood is imported, of which at least 75% are from the Mainland.

Fisheries scientists from the University of British Columbia, Canada, and a research team from the environmental organization ADM Capital Foundation, used ecologically based scientific calculation models to estimate the impact of climate change and overfishing on the number of fish and the profitability of fisheries in the East China Sea and the South China Sea.

The results of the study estimate that by the end of this century, if fishing activities continue as usual under severe climate change, the total weight of the main commercial fish species in the South China Sea will fall by more than 90%, and the annual revenue is expected to decrease by more than 11.5 billion U.S. dollars.

If the global average temperature rises by 1 degree, the South China Sea catches will be greatly reduced by 3 to 7 billion U.S. dollars

Even in a more optimistic simulation scenario, that is, by the middle of this century, when the global average temperature rises by one degree Celsius, the fishing income of the South China Sea is expected to decrease by 3 to 7 billion US dollars.

As for the East China Sea, if fishing activities are halved in the next 10 years, and assuming that the degree of climate change is slight, the biomass of East China Sea fisheries is expected to increase by 20% by 2100 compared to the current level. Among them, golden thread and bigeye are One of the most affected species.

Environmental organizations and universities have conducted research to estimate the impact of climate change and overfishing on the number of fish and the profitability of fisheries in the East China Sea and the South China Sea.

(Photo by Golden Chess)

Dr. Rashid Sumaila, University of British Columbia Institute of Oceanology and Fisheries (Dr. Rashid Sumaila) explained that the problem of warming in the East China Sea and the South China Sea is 10 times higher than the global average rate, and has been faced for decades. The problem of overfishing.

The seafood species commonly found in Hong Kong's seafood market, such as grouper, golden thread, and sea bream, may have their numbers greatly reduced by the end of this century, and they may even face the problem of extinction.

Dr. Yvonne Sadovy, an honorary professor of the University of Hong Kong, pointed out that many species of fish are currently used as animal feed. In some fishing operations, regardless of species or size, all fish, including a large number of seedlings, will be "caught in one net."

She suggested referring to other regions, legislating the size of the sieve of the fish net, and developing suitable protein feeds for animal feed.

Dr. Yvonne Sadovy, an honorary professor of the University of Hong Kong, suggested to refer to foreign countries and establish laws to regulate the mesh size of fishnets.

(Photo by Golden Chess)

Policy address | 8 adults say that the government is not determined to deal with climate change and promote carbon reduction. Hail in Tseung Kwan O | Liang Rongwu: Climate change may make hail bigger and should go indoors to avoid climate change irreversible Lin Chaoying warns that human food will be insufficient: a fish has a tooth Yan Lin Zheng expressed his deep condolences to the people of Henan Province, saying that the response to climate change requires the citizens to cooperate in the "Earth Hour" epidemic situation. Huang Jinxing: Fighting climate change is like fighting the current epidemic.

01News

Source: hk1

All news articles on 2021-11-03

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