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Five anglicisms that we never want to hear in the office again

2021-12-02T06:18:47.282Z

"Deadline", "work in progress" ... The drafting returns to these English expressions to be eradicated.



They are small pests, which come back again and again.

The

"globish"

fits into our daily life: at home, with friends ... and at the office, his favorite place.

French is thus neglected.

We take a

“call”

instead of a

“call”

, we

“deal”

with our partner rather than

“process”

, and we

“forward an email”

while ignoring the verb

“transfer”

.

How unfortunate it is to use English formulas, often incorrectly, when French is rich in a constellation of French equivalents!

The editorial returns to these anglicisms which fuse in the office, and proposes to ban them ... definitively.

● Deadline

He has met with tremendous success.

"Deadline"

bursts forth with force and noise in companies, particularly orally.

A flowering of French terms exists and can serve as equivalents to this unsightly Anglicism:

"deadline, deadline, deadline, deadline, deadline, deadline, deadline"

... There is no shortage of equivalents.

It is also possible to say:

“expiration date, deadline, last deadline, strict deadline, etc.”

, as the Linguistic Troubleshooting Bank reminds us.

● "Work in progress"

This English expression, once is not custom, can be said in various ways in French.

However, we hear it in English in different contexts:

“it's a“ work in progress ”, do not hesitate to make comments”

, or

“the“ work in progress ”is posted on the site”

, or even “ I was able to read his “work in progress”.

In these three cases, we prefer to say:

"it is still in progress"

,

"the creation in progress will be published on the site"

, and

"I was able to read his work in progress"

.

● Attended a "workshop"

"I'm going to a workshop with my team tomorrow"

.

As useless as it is ungrateful, this Anglicism is increasingly popular.

In French, it translates simply as

"seminary"

or

"workshop"

.

These words clearly designate what a

"workshop" is

, a work and exchange workshop centered on a specific theme.

● Be "corporate"

Being someone

"corporate"

is undoubtedly a quality that you hear defended during a job interview.

The only thing is: speaking

"Frenglish" in

front of a hierarchical superior can also work against you.

In French, a

“corporate” person

has

“the team spirit”

or

“the culture or the entrepreneurial spirit”

, as the Académie française reminds us.

● Long live the “team building!”

An activity, a trip, a drink ...

“Team building”

can take various forms.

Companies attach more and more importance to it, to strengthen the bonds of cohesion in a work team.

"Team building"

,

"team building"

... No need for crazy creativity to transpose the Anglo-Saxon formula into French.

Source: lefigaro

All news articles on 2021-12-02

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