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Carsten Neder, the man in reverse

2021-12-14T18:15:49.794Z

Carsten Neder, the man in reverse Created: 12/14/2021, 7:00 PM From: Hanna von Prittwitz He ran up and down the stairs in the Olympic Tower for 24 hours, backwards: Carsten Neder © christian Brecheis Carsten Neder from Weßling is a man of extremes, that's for sure. The Weßlinger spent the night on Saturday in the Olympic Tower in Munich. There he ran up and down the stairs 43 times for the goo



Carsten Neder, the man in reverse

Created: 12/14/2021, 7:00 PM

From: Hanna von Prittwitz

He ran up and down the stairs in the Olympic Tower for 24 hours, backwards: Carsten Neder © christian Brecheis

Carsten Neder from Weßling is a man of extremes, that's for sure.

The Weßlinger spent the night on Saturday in the Olympic Tower in Munich.

There he ran up and down the stairs 43 times for the good cause.

And backwards.

He may have set a world record with it.

Weßling

- Where does this beautiful and crazy story begin? In the ward for children with cancer in a Munich clinic. "I was very impressed by the way they all do it, the children, the nurses, the doctors, everyone," says Carsten Neder. The Wesslinger wanted to help, somehow. In the end there was a fundraising campaign for which the 45-year-old ran up and down the steps of the Olympic Tower in Munich for 24 hours at the weekend - to collect donations for the initiative for children with cancer in Munich and the Condrobs association. Because he had already organized an action of this kind in 2018, there was a variant this year: "I just walked backwards the stairs."

87,720 steps and 8,600 vertical meters in 24 hours, these numbers have to melt in your mouth. Videos, shot by Flo Hagena from Weßling, give a little bit of what Neder got into over the weekend. With bandaged knees and all in red, he stormed the Olympic Tower on Friday at 6 p.m., turned around and from then on spends 24 hours - apart from small breaks to eat and pee - in reverse. Neder trained for it for half a year. “Olympiapark GmbH kindly allowed me to do that,” he tells Starnberg Merkur.

At first he was only in the tower for a few hours, once a week. "I had to change my mind." Then it slowly increased to the last twelve hours. The stairs in the Olympic Tower are very short and high, "you have to push yourself up with a lot of force". 1020 steps lead 200 meters upwards. “There's always a lot going on in the thigh.” It seems to go down a lot faster. “I don't need to look ahead anymore, I have a system in my head.” Always at the top, a chalk line was drawn on the concrete. So that Neder doesn’t lose track. The Olympic Tower was his first choice. “Everyone knows it, and it's a landmark,” he emphasizes. And the cooperation with the employees of Olympiapark GmbH made the whole thing possible in the first place.

The first five laps were not a problem on Friday. Then the shock: "Unfortunately I twisted my knee." He almost had to break off. "But my team and my physiotherapist managed to do it again." He had to develop a new technique, especially downwards, and put different strain on the firmly taped knee. Once he got that out, it went like clockwork again.

24 hours in a narrow concrete tower. This is only for the really tough. Neder is undoubtedly one of them, as the man has been doing ultra trail running in his free time for twelve years. These runs take place off-road in the field and mostly lead over long distances and many meters in altitude. Neder completed his last competition in the summer in Fieberbrunn. He ran 175 kilometers and 10,000 meters of altitude across country without a break. In contrast, the Olympic Tower sounds almost like a walk again. Or maybe not: "24 hours just concrete walls, that's a challenge," says Neder. He heard music and activated his imagination. Last but not least, he was supported by his strong team. 25 people from family and friends were at his side.“A team member sat every 50 meters in the tower and motivated me.” Among the helpers: His sons Noah and Joshua, seven and nine years old, and his partner Katja. They get along well with his whimsy, says Neder. “They don't know anything else. And they stand behind me and my craziness. "

In total, Neder wanted to run up and down the tower 40 times on Friday. In 2018 he had completed 50 laps, mind you in forward gear. And collected 20,000 euros in donations for this. This time he actually managed more than planned, namely 43 laps. Numerous companies from the district of Starnberg and Munich had bet different amounts of money, starting with five cents per level. Neder am Sonntag did not yet know exactly how high the proceeds would be this year, "the clubs still have to figure that out".

The initiative for children with cancer in Munich has existed since 1985. It supports children and their families through various measures with the aim of improving their living conditions. This includes, for example, the assumption of costs if the parents of the children want to spend the night near the clinic. Neder has taken the Condrobs association on board this year, "because it also takes care of the children and adolescents, especially in times of the pandemic". Neder only organized the entire event with his team. “As a result, all of the donations end up with the associations.” It was not clear yesterday whether he also managed to set a world record from Friday to Saturday. “I will definitely submit the campaign,” says Neder.

On Sunday, however, the 45-year-old had heavy legs for the time being.

The injured knee was also slightly offended.

“It's a bit thick,” says Neder.

In the next few days there will be no training, but relaxation.

According to Neder's motto: "Always stay positive, then it will heal faster."

Source: merkur

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