The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

Living in Munich is so expensive! What will change for tenants in 2022: an expert explains the details

2022-01-24T21:03:00.351Z

Living in Munich is so expensive! What will change for tenants in 2022: an expert explains the details Created: 01/24/2022, 21:51 By: Andreas Thieme You are threatened with a hefty rent increase: Otto and Karin H. have been living in the rented apartment in Schwabing for 35 years. © Tenants' Association/Philipp Gülland A consolation, but not a big hit. This summarizes the changes that Munich t



Living in Munich is so expensive!

What will change for tenants in 2022: an expert explains the details

Created: 01/24/2022, 21:51

By: Andreas Thieme

You are threatened with a hefty rent increase: Otto and Karin H. have been living in the rented apartment in Schwabing for 35 years.

© Tenants' Association/Philipp Gülland

A consolation, but not a big hit.

This summarizes the changes that Munich tenants will face in 2022.

Volker Rastätter from the Tenants' Association explains what's new and what you should be aware of.    

Munich - "It's good that the rental price brake is still in place," says Rastätter. In Bavaria it runs until 2025, the traffic light coalition wants to extend it nationwide until 2029. “The rental price brake is better than nothing. But she has too many exceptions - for example, if the previous tenant has already paid a higher rent. "Another mistake is that tenants take action and have to reprimand their landlord. “And even then there is no penalty for landlords for not observing the brakes. Only the rent will be adjusted.”

Volker Rastätter says: "In general, a complete freeze on rents would be best for Munich's tenants.

So a rent freeze via federal laws. ”That would cover rents for re-letting and, unlike the rent brake, also prevent rent increases in existing buildings.

However, the traffic light coalition could not agree on a rent freeze.

At least there should be a lowering of the capping limit.

In tense housing markets such as Munich, rents are only to be allowed to increase by eleven percent in three years up to the local comparative rent - instead of the previous 15 percent.

Munich: In the future, rents should only be allowed to rise by a maximum of eleven percent in three years

According to Rastätter, another improvement is that the CO2 price will probably be divided between tenants and landlords from June.

“So far, tenants have paid the tax in full, although they have no influence on the type of heating.

It would have been logical for landlords to pay for this tax.” Due to rising energy costs, the federal government wants to introduce a heating cost subsidy for housing benefit in the first half of the year.

“Giving people a helping hand is a step in the right direction.

However, many tenants who do not receive housing benefit also suffer greatly from energy costs.”

The most expensive place in Germany: In Munich, a square meter apartment costs more than 30 euros in rent.

© imago/Ralph Peters

When it comes to television, tenants will have more freedom of choice in the future: "Since the end of 2021 it has been clear that landlords will no longer be allowed to charge a flat rate for cable costs over the operating costs," says Rastätter.

Landlords are granted a transitional period until July 1, 2024.

“As a result of the change, tenants can decide for themselves how and whether they want to watch television.

This could make it more expensive for tenants whose landlords have concluded cheap, long-term collective agreements with the cable network operators.”

Source: merkur

All news articles on 2022-01-24

You may like

Life/Entertain 2022-03-03T13:13:10.385Z

Trends 24h

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy