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Elections in Italy 2022, live | Participation at noon reaches 19%, almost the same figure as in the previous elections

2022-09-25T14:10:41.545Z

The right-wing coalition starts as the favourite, with far-right leader Giorgia Meloni at the helm | More than 50 million Italians vote to elect 600 parliamentarians, a third less than in the previous elections | Schools will close at 11:00 p.m.



EL PAÍS offers free of charge the last hour of the Italian elections as a public service.

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More than 50.8 million Italians are called this Sunday to the polls to elect the 400 deputies of the Chamber and the 200 senators, a third less than those who voted in the previous elections.

Those over 18 years of age will be able to vote until 11:00 p.m.

After five hours of voting, the electoral authorities have reported that the turnout at 12:00 has reached 19.21%, almost the same figure as in 2018, when it was 19.43%.

The polls attribute a loose majority to the right-wing coalition and predict that the far-right Brothers of Italy party will add up to 25% of the preferences, which would make its leader, Giorgia Meloni, the first woman to preside over the Council of Ministers in the country.

The left, headed by former Prime Minister Enrico Letta, of the Democratic Party (PD), appears fragmented,

while the 5 Star Movement faces threats to its survival after the split of a hundred parliamentarians.

Italy has released 67 executives in the last 76 years.

  • Visual Guide |

    Why the union of Meloni, Salvini and Berlusconi gives the right an advantage in the elections

  • The elections in Italy, in pictures

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The open wound of southern Italy

A hundred 

arancini

, those delicious battered pyramids of Sicilian rice and meat ragu, evaporate from the bar counter of the ferry crossing the Straits of Messina.

Too good to survive a journey of barely 20 minutes.

The route, covered by several companies and a dozen boats loaded with trucks and passengers that cross from one side of the canal to the other, links Calabria with Sicily.

For centuries it was the imaginary bridge that joined the Kingdom of the two Sicilies.

But also the fastest way to access services or necessities still forgotten in southern Italy.

Today on this ferry - the company is called Caronte, like the boatman of the dead souls in the 

Divine Comedy

― Doctors, tourists, merchants, carriers, fairgrounds travel.

A human test tube that contains many of the problems that plague southern Italy and that the right now wants to solve by recovering the old idea of ​​building a gigantic bridge.

The 3.3 kilometers that separate the tip of Sicily in Messina from the small and punished town of Villa San Giovanni (Calabria) are also the shortest line between the reality of Italy and the political propaganda that emerges every time there are elections.

It has been going on for 30 years, when Silvio Berlusconi, then leader of an emerging Forza Italia, first promised that he would build a bridge linking the island to the mainland.

A monumental project that should sew the open wound for decades between the north and south of Italy, where two economic realities coexist comparable to the GDP of Germany and Albania.

An infrastructure that, in fact, had been talked about for a century, but that nobody had taken seriously until that political gambler put it back on the table.

Now,

By

Daniel Verdu

In the image, by

Paolo Manzo

, the bridge project over the Strait of Messina, which was to link Calabria and Sicily, remains a ghost idea 30 years after it was launched.

Read here the complete information

14:05

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ELECTIONS IN ITALY |

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Why are elections called?

Italy has been the scene of 67 governments in the last 76 years.

The Italian Prime Minister, Mario Draghi, announced his resignation last July after losing the support of his Executive partners, when the right-wing parties of the Government, La Liga and Forza Italia, and the 5 Star Movement decided not to vote the confidence motion in the Senate.

The crisis was triggered by the departure of the current Foreign Minister, Luigi Di Maio, from the 5 Star Movement and the split of a new group with 60 parliamentarians under the pretext of the war in Ukraine and the discrepancy over the shipment of weapons to kyiv.  

14:02

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Italy is doomed to division

“A man is in bed, wanting to sleep.

A rat is on the wall by his head, wanting to move.

The man hears the rat stir and cannot sleep, the rat hears the man stir and does not dare to move.

They are both miserable;

one stirring, the other waiting.

Or both happy, the rat moving and the man sleeping.

It is curious that this fragment of 

Murphy

, a novel written by Samuel Beckett in 1938, has become for two decades the metaphor of the crisis in which Western democracies have plunged.

With each election date, this stalemate is presented to us more clearly each time, drowning in advance any hope of a result that does not compromise the country's unity.

By

Sandro Veronesi

Illustration of

Mr. Garcia

Read the full gallery here

13:56

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ELECTIONS IN ITALY |

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

How many representatives are elected?

The Parliament that will be constituted after the elections will be the first to have 600 seats, after the Italians chose in a referendum held in 2020 to cut the number of parliamentarians by a third. 

The constitutional referendum registered almost 60% participation, with a result (69% yes support) overwhelmingly favorable to the reform.

The cut reduces the seats in the Chamber of Deputies from 630 to 400. And in the Senate from 315 to 200. Italy goes from having one deputy for every 96,000 inhabitants and one senator for every 188,000 citizens to being one of the countries in the EU with the lowest number of deputies with respect to its population: one for every 151,000 inhabitants (in Spain they are one for every 133,000).

With this new norm, for example, some of the main Italian cities, such as Turin, Naples or Palermo will elect a single senator. 

13:51

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Italy and us

Recent Italian politics has worked by making a strange pendulum between populism and technocracy, as if it were not possible to find a middle way, normal

democratic politics 

.

In the first field we find characters such as Romano Prodi, Mario Monti or Mario Draghi, called in their day to channel the destruction caused by the Berlusconi, Beppe Grillo's 5 Star Movement, or Matteo Salvini's La Liga.

rational

corrections 

 urged by Brussels against the excesses of passionate politics.

But the pendulum is also swinging in the other direction.

Technocratic tutelage continues to be a democratic anomaly.

Now it seems that we are facing a new shift to the other extreme, the populism led by one of the most controversial political figures of recent years, Giorgia Meloni.

By

Fernando Vallespin

In the image, of

Alessandra Tarantino

(AP), from the left, Matteo Salvini, Silvio Berlusconi and Georgia Meloni, on Wednesday during the closing of the Italian right-wing campaign in Rome.

Read the full column here

13:47

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ELECTIONS IN ITALY |

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

How does the electoral law work?

Italy approved in 2017 a new electoral law that is committed to a mixed system between proportional and majority.

The regulation, called the

Rosatellum bis

law (named after the deputy Ettore Rosato), provides that 36% of the seats, both in the Chamber of Deputies and in the Senate, are assigned with a majority system of single-member constituencies (each party or coalition should present a single candidate and the seat would be awarded to the one with the most votes).

The remaining 64% is linked to a proportional system, a modality that favors alliances between parties.

13:41

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What the polls say about the elections in Italy: the extreme right as the probable winner

Italians vote on Sunday to configure the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies, from which a new government will emerge.

Although polls have not been published for days, they have left two clear forecasts: (1) the majority will probably be for the right-wing coalition;

and (2) the first party in the bloc —and surely also the first national force— will be the Brothers of Italy, the far-right party led by Giorgia Meloni.

By

Kiko Llaneras

In the image, of

Alessia Pierdomenico

(Bloomberg), Giorgia Meloni, leader of the Brothers of Italy, during a campaign event of the right-wing coalition, on Thursday.

Read the full analysis here

13:35

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ELECTIONS IN ITALY |

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

How do Italians vote abroad?

The 4.8 million Italians residing abroad have been able to vote by mail until last Thursday, September 22, to elect eight deputies and four senators.

The majority of Italian voters abroad are concentrated in Europe (2,645,030).

The ballots collected at the consulate offices are sent to Italy.

The counting of the votes begins at 11:00 p.m. this Sunday, along with the rest of the ballots.

13:31

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Visual Guide |

Why the union of Meloni, Salvini and Berlusconi gives the right an advantage in the elections

What Italians choose and how they vote, in graphics.

By

Javier Galan

and

Mariano Zafra

Check here the complete information

13:25

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ELECTIONS IN ITALY |

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

How do you vote?

Electors receive two ballots, one to elect members of the Chamber of Deputies and one for the Senate.

The ballots include the names of the candidates of the single-member constituencies (each party or coalition should present a single candidate and the seat would be awarded to the one with the most votes) or the lists with the names of the candidates in the multi-member college.

You can vote by marking with a cross the symbol of the list or the name of the candidate or both.

However, it is not considered valid to vote for a candidate's name and symbol from a list other than the one to which it belongs.

Voters have to deliver the mobile to the polling station before entering the booth to vote.

Minors cannot access the cabin to accompany their parents either. 

The ballot papers have the so-called "anti-fraud clipping", a small piece of paper with an alphanumeric code.

After the vote, the president of the polling station cuts it out and checks that the code on the ballot handed in by the voter is the same as the ballot given by the polling station.

After verification, the vote is deposited in the ballot box.

13:16

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The EU awaits the prospect of a far-right government in Rome

Italian citizens are summoned to the polls this Sunday in legislative elections that, according to the polls, will bring to power a right-wing coalition with the radical Brothers of Italy party as the protagonist and its leader, Giorgia Meloni, as the probable next Prime Minister. .

If the forecasts are confirmed, it would be the first Executive led by the extreme right in Western Europe in recent history.

The European institutions and the big players in the EU are preparing for a relationship with premises that can lead to friction or even conflict.

Statements made on Friday by the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, gave a glimpse of the tension underlying the political transition in Italy.

“My attitude is that we collaborate with any democratic government that wants to collaborate with us.

If things go in a difficult direction, as I said with respect to Hungary and Poland, we have tools, "said the president, referring to the prospect of a government led by the extreme right in Rome during a conference in Princeton.

Matteo Salvini, leader of La Liga and an ally of Meloni, was quick to respond via Twitter: “What is it?

A threat?

Shameful arrogance.

Respect the free, democratic and sovereign vote of the Italian people!

Friends of all, servants of no one”.

By

Andrea Rizzi

and

Daniel Verdu

In the image,

Alessandra Benedetti

(Corbis via Getty), Giorgia Meloni, at her closing rally on Friday in Rome.

Read here the complete information

13:04

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ELECTIONS IN ITALY |

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Who votes?

All citizens over 18 years of age, residing in Italy or abroad, can vote.

For the first time, 18-year-old voters will be able to vote for the Senate.

Until now, only those over 25 years of age could do it.

Those admitted to hospitals and inmates can also exercise the right to vote.

12:55

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Photo gallery |

Elections in Italy, in pictures

About 51 million Italians are summoned to the polls to elect 600 parliamentarians (400 deputies and 200 senators).

We show you the best photos of election day.

Foto de Gianluca Battista

Consulte aquí la fotogalería completa

12:48

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Los electores esperan en cola su turno para votar en la escuela Vittorio Bachelet de Roma, donde también votará Giorgia Meloni, la líder de Hermanos de Italia, favorita en las elecciones. Foto de Gianluca Battista

12:41

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En esta imagen, de Gianluca Battista, votantes en el instituto Edmondo De Amicis, en el barrio de Testaccio de Roma, donde este domingo también ha votado el candidato del centroizquierda, Enrico Letta.  

12:37

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ELECCIONES EN ITALIA | PREGUNTAS Y RESPUESTAS

¿Hasta cuándo se vota?

Este domingo, más de 50,8 millones de italianos están llamados a las urnas para elegir el nuevo Parlamento, que por primera vez estará formado por 400 diputados y 200 senadores, un tercio menos que en la actualidad. Los ciudadanos pueden votar de 7.00 a 23.00.

12:34

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La participación al mediodía alcanza el 19%, casi la misma cifra que en los anteriores comicios

Las autoridades electorales italianas han informado de que la participación a las 12.00 hora local en las elecciones legislativas de este domingo ha alcanzado el 19,21% tras cinco horas de votación. Esta cifra es casi la misma que en 2018, cuando hubo una participación del 19,43%. Las urnas estarán abiertas hasta las 23.00. Inmediatamente después comenzará el recuento de papeletas, aunque no se esperan resultados hasta la jornada del lunes. 

11:51

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Buenas tardes. Comenzamos este directo en el que les vamos a contar la última hora de las elecciones en Italia, donde más de 50,8 millones de ciudadanos están llamados este domingo a las urnas para elegir a los 400 diputados de la Cámara y a los 200 senadores, un tercio menos de los que se votaron en los anteriores comicios.

Los colegios electorales de Italia abrieron hoy a las 7.00 hora local y cierran a las 23.00. Se trata de unos comicios generales que pueden hacer historia si, como indican todos los sondeos, la ultraderechista Giorgia Meloni se hace con la victoria y se convierte en la primera mujer en llegar al poder en el país. 

Meloni, leader of the Brothers of Italy (FdI) and the coalition that also includes the far-right League, led by Matteo Salvini, and the conservative Forza Italia (FI), led by Silvio Berlusconi, are the big favorites for a victory that is expected to be overwhelming, since polls give him nearly 20 points ahead of Enrico Letta's progressive Democratic Party (PD) and his small center-left allies.

(THE COUNTRY)

11:43

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Source: elparis

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