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Brain hemorrhage at 14, but Yasmin Weger goes her own way

2022-12-24T06:06:52.947Z


Brain hemorrhage at 14, but Yasmin Weger goes her own way Created: 12/24/2022, 07:00 By: Veronica power Yasmin Weger is a cheerful young woman. The 22-year-old likes to laugh and loves life. © Private At the age of 14, Yasmin Weger suffered a brain hemorrhage. But she never gives up. Now the 22-year-old is learning her dream job: becoming a nanny. Erding – Leaving home, falling in love, going


Brain hemorrhage at 14, but Yasmin Weger goes her own way

Created: 12/24/2022, 07:00

By: Veronica power

Yasmin Weger is a cheerful young woman.

The 22-year-old likes to laugh and loves life.

© Private

At the age of 14, Yasmin Weger suffered a brain hemorrhage.

But she never gives up.

Now the 22-year-old is learning her dream job: becoming a nanny.

Erding

– Leaving home, falling in love, going on vacation with your boyfriend, finding your dream job: many young adults have these goals, including Yasmin Weger.

The 22-year-old wears leather leggings, her fingernails are painted red, and a silver bracelet jingles on her wrist.

She laughs a lot, is an incredibly happy person - and a fighter by nature.

Because Yasmin has been in a wheelchair since she had a brain hemorrhage eight years ago.

But that doesn't stop her from fulfilling her dream: Yasmin wants to be a nanny and is well on the way there.

By the way: Everything from the region is now also available in our regular Erding newsletter.

It is November 5th, 2014 that Yasmin Weger and her family will never forget.

"It's been a pretty shitty day," she wrote years later in a post on her Facebook page.

That's her way, a bit flippant, a bit tongue-in-cheek.

This is how the young woman deals with her fate.

She was 14 at the time and on her way home from a meeting of the youth fire brigade in her hometown of Pastetten, which she loved to take part in.

But at home she suddenly has such a bad headache that she screams.

She collapses in the hallway.

Diagnosis: cerebral hemorrhage.

A year and a half of worrying, hoping, fighting: "Like a bad horror movie"

The girl is put into a coma.

A year and a half of worrying, hoping and fighting followed.

“Like in a bad horror film”, Yasmin Weger describes this time when our newspaper visits her for the first time in the summer of 2016.

She was isolated in intensive care for 16 months.

She has to be operated on several times, a titanium plate is inserted under her scalp and a shunt, both of which she will wear for the rest of her life.

But there are complications: She suffers a second brain hemorrhage, the shunt becomes infected with the hospital germ MRSA, Yasmin Weger's right arm has to be saved through an emergency operation after an incorrectly placed infusion.

This is evidenced by a large scar that she has now hidden under a tattoo.

It says "Stay Strong".

"The tattoo artist gave it to me because I'm such a strong girl," says Yasmin Weger.

And he's absolutely right about that.

Because she never loses heart, works hard - speech therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy.

"It's gotten a lot better, and it's going to get a lot better," she says in a low but clear voice.

And so, two years late, she was able to catch up on her high school diploma in Forstern in 2017.

Yasmin Weger's dream job has always been a nanny

The young woman then begins training as a specialist in office communication at the vocational training center in Munich-Sendling.

"Forcibly," as she says, because the employment agency said: this or work in a workshop for the disabled.

Yasmin Weger has had a dream job since she was little: nanny.

But she couldn't do that, it was said at the time.

And so she completes her training in the office.

She will receive her diploma on stage in the summer.

With walkers and help, but standing on both feet.

And that's what she wants in life too: to stand on both feet, to go her own way.

The self-confident young woman has been doing that since September and has been attending the new vocational school for childcare in Erding.

"It's great there, the people are super nice.

I get along well with almost everyone, only some of them don't get along with my open nature and my sense of humor.” But she doesn't let that get her down either.

The pastry owner, who now lives in Langengeisling, likes to go out with her fiancé Felix Fach – to eat, for example.

© private

Yasmin Weger recently moved to Langengeisling with her boyfriend.

27-year-old Felix Fach, who is studying interior design in Munich, met her during his apprenticeship.

"It sparked right away," says Yasmin Weger beaming.

They have been a couple for four and a half years, even engaged, planning their future together.

The parents Anja and Christian Weger still live in Pastetten, as do the younger brothers Fabian and Marcel and their best friend.

"I don't see her as often as I used to, but we talk on the phone almost every day," says Yasmin Weger about her parents.

They support the young couple financially, as do Felix' parents.

Her training lasts two years, then Yasmin Weger is a state-certified nanny, and then she can finally work with children.

The 22-year-old is currently doing this one day a week during an internship at the kindergarten in Zorneding, where she used to live.

How does she get there?

“With the wheelchair to the S-Bahn and by train to Zorneding.

The drivers lay down a ramp for me.”

Nanny in wheelchair?

No problem for the kindergarten children

The children have no problems with their disabilities.

“A colleague has been in a wheelchair since birth.

So the children are used to it.” They play, draw, and when she needs support, she asks her colleagues.

"Everything quite normal.

And I think it's good that the children are learning how to deal with wheelchair users and that we're just like them."

Meanwhile, Yasmin Weger continues to train diligently, goes to physiotherapy and is making great progress: she has learned to walk again.

"It's going great," she says with a smile.

"I can move both legs, only the left arm, nothing happens there." After all: Since a hypnosis by Dieter Orth in Zorneding, the left hand is open again, before it was permanently clenched into a fist.

"That's really great," says Yasmin Weger, who proudly posts her successes on her Facebook page on a regular basis.

Small videos that show: I can do it!

Accessibility is not always so good

And she also has a lot to do in everyday life.

Because accessibility is not always so good.

Sometimes she has to use a wheelchair on the street, “I can't get up on most sidewalks.

But then I always say: I have four wheels and an engine, I can do that,” she says with a laugh.

And when she wanted to take the bus with her school companion, she had to wait for five buses because they were all too full to take her.

"It's often not that easy," says the young woman, who likes to party with her boyfriend in her free time and is kept on the go by her dog Rocco.

The two will spend Christmas with their families.

"Felix also needs a break from me," says Yasmin Weger - after all, he is the one who takes care of her and the household alongside his studies.

Yasmin Weger has also started writing her story, from the day of the brain hemorrhage to today.

Even if only the right hand works: “Of course I type on the laptop.

I have a healthy hand.” She also takes notes at school as normal – and so she is getting closer to her dream of working with children bit by bit.

vam

Source: merkur

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