The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

"King of Care": Charles III. intervene in

2022-12-27T12:02:09.711Z


"King of Care": Charles III. intervene in Created: 2022-12-27Updated: 2022-12-27 12:52 p.m King Charles III of Great Britain speaks during the recording of his first Christmas sermon at St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. © Victoria Jones/PA Pool via AP/dpa A king's Christmas speech: After 70 years under Queen Elizabeth II, her son Charles promptly sets his own accents. How political is Charl


"King of Care": Charles III.

intervene in

Created: 2022-12-27Updated: 2022-12-27 12:52 p.m

King Charles III

of Great Britain speaks during the recording of his first Christmas sermon at St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle.

© Victoria Jones/PA Pool via AP/dpa

A king's Christmas speech: After 70 years under Queen Elizabeth II, her son Charles promptly sets his own accents.

How political is Charles III.

act?

London - Visually, the new one made it different.

Standing, King Charles III.

his Christmas speech.

This was an unfamiliar sight for many Britons, who were used to seeing his mother Queen Elizabeth II sitting behind her desk.

Above all, however, the 74-year-old set his own course in terms of content.

In contrast to the "eternal queen", who only hinted at problems, Charles makes little secret of his opinion.

He clearly mentioned the suffering of many people who can hardly pay for food and energy.

Thanks to the health workers

Charles also explicitly thanked health workers and public sector workers, who are currently engaged in bitter collective bargaining disputes with the conservative government.

Was that a sign of what the monarch himself thought of it?

Commentators promptly warned that the king was in danger of becoming politically involved.

That would be against the norm, as British monarchs are traditionally neutral.

Broadcaster Sky News asked: "Is King Charles crossing a line?"

Observers had expected that Charles would deviate - at least a little bit - from the behavior of his mother, who was known for her disciplined attitude.

In the kingdom, Charles had repeatedly appeared with his own themes and theses.

It was said that he was “outspoken”, which can be translated as “bluntly” or “straightforward”.

The palace did not contradict a report that Charles had expressed his horror in a private conversation about the government's plan to fly illegal migrants to Rwanda without checking their background.

That was just before the Queen died.

The king shows his empathy

Even as a king, he has already attracted attention with a little diplomatic statement.

"Back again - dear oh dear," he welcomed then-Prime Minister Liz Truss to an audience.

Truss' numerous critics laughed, while others emphasized that the king wanted to cheer up the head of government, who was in serious trouble.

In any case, one thing is clear: such a statement by the Queen would never have been made public if it had existed at all.

So now the comments in the Christmas speech: Charles promptly received praise for the empathy shown.

The newspaper "Daily Express" called him "King of Caring" - the "King of Caring".

A "royal message of love and hope" was recognized by the tabloid "Daily Mail" and the "Times" praised the speech as a "gift" for struggling workers.

The positive response adds to the first impressions Charles has had since the Queen died on September 8.

It is no longer noticeable that he is sticking to his long-established commitment to nature, for which he was once derided as a "green idiot".

But Charles does not seem to want to limit himself to the environment and nature alone.

That could also influence public opinion, commented Stephen Bates, the former Royals reporter for the liberal newspaper The Guardian.

The speech preached the values ​​that the Tories had abandoned.

"He lauded the civil service and volunteers and invoked the sympathetic conservatism that the government has banished from its ranks and rhetoric." It is now clear, Bates noted, that Charles can and will voice his concerns, even if it is to Cabinet not be right.

also read

"I can't stand it": ZDF viewers appalled by the new "Traumschiff" episode 

READ

Strange custom: British royal family have to weigh themselves before and after the Christmas holidays

READ

King Charles III

breaks with Queen tradition in first Christmas speech

READ

Worst Advent show of all time: Florian Silbereisen without Helene Fischer at the low point 

READ

“Have you been drinking?”: Barbara Schöneberger calls Bergdoktor Hans Sigl at 6 a.m

READ

Fancy a voyage of discovery?

My space

The royal family as a united front?

Only one hurdle remains: the family.

Charles' brother Prince Andrew, long disgraced for his involvement in a sex abuse scandal, is increasingly being pushed out of the palace by Charles.

Arguing with his younger son is likely to be less easy for Charles to settle.

The allegations that Prince Harry and his wife Duchess Meghan recently brought up again in a Netflix series seem to have bounced off the Royal Family.

Now she's gearing up for Harry's memoir, due out January 10, which is set to be a lot more explosive.

Here, too, a joint appearance is likely to be the key, say experts.

And the newspaper "Telegraph" comments: "The success of the king's first year will largely depend on whether his family, who are under fire, will form a united front."

Source: merkur

All news articles on 2022-12-27

Trends 24h

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy

The information on this site is from external sources that are not under our control.
The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.