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Military expert Masala becomes clear in “Lanz” – on the subject of migration: “You spit in their face”

2023-01-16T04:04:13.441Z

Military expert Masala becomes clear in “Lanz” – on the subject of migration: “You spit in their face” Created: 01/16/2023, 04:55 Carlo Masala on January 11th on “Markus Lanz” on ZDF. © Markus Hertrich/ZDF In the discussion about failed integration policies, Carlo Masala gives German politicians devastating feedback. Hubertus Heil fears for his pension.   Hamburg – On Wednesday (January 11), M



Military expert Masala becomes clear in “Lanz” – on the subject of migration: “You spit in their face”

Created: 01/16/2023, 04:55

Carlo Masala on January 11th on “Markus Lanz” on ZDF.

© Markus Hertrich/ZDF

In the discussion about failed integration policies, Carlo Masala gives German politicians devastating feedback.

Hubertus Heil fears for his pension.  

Hamburg – On Wednesday (January 11), Markus Lanz will first look towards Lützerath.

To where climate activists want to prevent RWE from completely demolishing the small hamlet of the city of Erkelenz.

The

Rheinische Post

journalist Antje Höning has no understanding for the protest.

"The climate will not be saved in Lützerath," she says.

However, military expert Carlo Masala also sees the media as having a duty not to offer the protests a large platform.

"When I see that some newspapers have set up a live ticker to report what's happening in Lützerath, and at the same time a war is taking place on our doorstep, then the relationship doesn't fit," he complains.

Masala: You spit in the face of those who have lived here for two generations

This is the beginning of Masala's angry speech.

He is not only a professor at the Bundeswehr University, but also the son of Italian guest workers who came to Germany in the 1960s.

When Lanz Masala addresses the discussion after the riot on New Year's Eve, the 54-year-old gets excited.

First he lists what he has noticed in the past few days: first name query, West Asian phenotype, deportation.

"More than a million people with a migration background live in Neukölln and about 70 of them rioted on New Year's Eve, that's less than zero point zero percent," he notes.

He is all the more angry that, according to some demands, an entire group is taken into custody.

"You spit in the face of those who have lived here for two or three generations," says Masala.

Markus Lanz – these guests will be discussing on January 11 with:

  • Hubertus Heil (SPD)

    - The Federal Minister for Labor and Social Affairs

  • Simon Jäger

    - Head of the Bonn Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

  • Antje Höning

    - journalist

  • Carlo Masala

    - military expert

When asked how the integration of young men can be better achieved, Carlo Masala again becomes fundamental.

He tells about his parents.

"People wanted workers, but forgot that people also came," he says, "there were no German courses for my parents and no support to become a part of this society".

Masala is therefore harsh on politicians: “In Germany, integration policy has never been pursued.

People were happy when the guest workers were in their ghettos.”

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Because of his southern appearance and his name, he too had experienced discrimination and didn't feel German.

"Although I was born in Germany and have had a German passport for 20 years, I'm still Italian," he shakes his head.

“But how should Ali, Ahmed and Ayse feel first?” he asks the group.

The call for deportation is nothing more than "a cheap demand" because that is simply not possible for people who were born in Germany and have a German passport.

Lanz leads explosive New Year's Eve and migration debate with Masala - then it's about the job market

Antje Höning offers a pragmatic solution to avoid such riots as on New Year's Eve when she proposes a ban on firecrackers.

But Lanz does not pursue this further in view of the advanced time.

Instead, he talks to an economist, Simon Jäger, who is supposed to report on the future of the German labor market.

The disappearance of the baby boomer generation will leave a huge gap that some researchers say cannot be filled with local workers.

Labor Minister Hubertus Heil in conversation with economic expert Antje Höning ("Rheinische Post").

© Markus Hertrich/ZDF

First of all, Jäger notes how difficult it is for German companies to attract skilled workers.

"We are in international competition for well-trained people," he says, aiming to make top talent from abroad also interesting for other job markets in Europe or the USA, for example.

That is why Germany must create attractive conditions.

“We have to ask ourselves why someone should come to Germany when there is a demand for it all over the world.

Certainly not because of the good weather,” says Jäger.

It should be borne in mind that Germany already has a competitive disadvantage compared to the English and French-speaking countries due to the language barrier.

Lanz elicits an explosive statement from Heil: "The pension is secure as long as..."

Jäger offers an interesting view on the definition of the term "shortage of skilled workers".

This vocabulary is used if an advertised position is not filled under the conditions specified there, he explains.

"Maybe you just have to change something about these conditions," says the head of the Bonn institute on the future of work.

An example from his circle of acquaintances: A hairdresser from Bonn offered a four-day week after several unsuccessful advertisements.

"She could hardly save herself from applications," says Jäger.

In this respect, the shortage of skilled workers is also a question of the general conditions of the employer.

However, the exit of the baby boomer generation from the labor market also brings with it a consequential problem – how is the pension of this large group financed?

That's why Lanz leans over to Labor Minister Hubertus Heil (SPD), recalls Norbert Blüm's legendary quote "the pension is safe", and asks the minister: "Mr. Heil, is the pension still safe today?" Who has a clear answer hoped for, disappointed.

"As long as the labor market is stable, the pension is also secure," says Heil.

Oops!

This does not help reassure those who want to receive their pension in the future. 

Markus Lanz – Summary of the show:

Carlo Masala has largely taken over the show with his personal experiences.

Masala also provided thoughts and experiences worth hearing.

The round really hung on his every word.

Simon Jäger's assessments of the labor market also offered interesting aspects.

In this round, the Secretary of Labor came up short.

After all, his assessment of the pension should make you sit up and take notice.

(Christoph Heuser)

Source: merkur

All news articles on 2023-01-16

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