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Ukraine - Russia war: latest news live | Putin equates the "crimes" of Ukraine with those of the Nazis, on the day of the Holocaust

2023-01-27T12:28:30.815Z


Hungary to veto EU sanctions on Moscow on nuclear energy | kyiv says fighting is intensifying in the east and north of the country


EL PAÍS offers the last hour of the conflict in Ukraine free of charge as a public service.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday equated Ukraine with Nazi Germany on International Holocaust Day.

"Crimes against civilians, ethnic cleansing and punitive actions organized by neo-Nazis in Ukraine are precisely the evil against which our soldiers fought shoulder to shoulder [in World War II]," the Russian president said in the message posted. for the 78th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp by the Red Army, an event to which the Kremlin was not invited.

Meanwhile, the Hungarian Prime Minister, Viktor Orbán, has announced that his country will veto any European Union sanction against Russia that affects nuclear energy, after kyiv asked the Twenty-seven to include the Russian state company Rosatom in the restrictions. .

"It's out of the question," Orbán has settled in an interview on public radio.

On the ground, fighting has intensified in the east and north of the country, as denounced by the Ukrainian military authorities.

The governor of Kharkov, Oleh Sinehubov, has reported new bombardments in the province, while the army is preparing for a possible Russian offensive around Bakhmut.

  • The origin of the conflict

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Fighting intensifies in northern and eastern Ukraine

Ukraine has reported this Friday that Russia has intensified attempts to break through Ukraine's defenses with heavy fighting in the north and east of the country.

The increased activity at the front comes a day after Moscow launched a new massive attack against the country with dozens of missiles that killed 11 people. 

These actions could be Russia's response to the shipment of modern tanks that the allied countries have announced.

Germany and the United States promised Ukraine dozens of armored vehicles to help push back Russian forces, opening the way for Canada, Poland, Finland, Norway and others to do the same.

Russia accused the United States of "throwing weapons into Ukraine" and rebuked President Joe Biden, saying he held the key to ending the conflict in Ukraine. 

Local officials on Friday reported heavy shelling in northern, northeastern and eastern Ukraine, the scene of some of the most intense fighting since the invasion of Russia began on February 24 last year.

"Fierce fighting continues along the front lines. Our defenders firmly hold their positions and inflict losses on the enemy," said Oleh Synehubov, governor of the north-eastern Kharkiv region.

Russian forces are intensifying fighting along the eastern front line, using their recent capture of the city of Soledar to increase pressure on the besieged city of Bakhmut.

The front lines have hardly moved in the past two months.

However, both sides are expected to launch an offensive in the spring.

The United States has advised Ukraine not to do so until new arms shipments arrive and training has been provided, a process that will take several months.

Oleskandr Musiyenko, head of Ukraine's Center for Military and Strategic Research, says Russia was sending reinforcements, mainly conscripts, to block Ukraine's advances.

"But they don't have the level of artillery and tank support that they had on February 24," Musiyenko told Ukrainian television.

(Reuters)

11:24

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What has happened in the last hours

On the 338th day of the war started by Russia against Ukraine, these are the key data at 12:00 this Friday, January 27:

Putin equates Ukraine's “crimes” with those of Nazi Germany on the day of the Holocaust.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has equated Ukraine with Nazi Germany on International Holocaust Day.

"Crimes against civilians, ethnic cleansing and punitive actions organized by neo-Nazis in Ukraine are precisely the evil that our soldiers fought shoulder to shoulder (in World War II)," the Russian president said.

Hungary will veto EU sanctions on Russia on nuclear power.

The Hungarian Prime Minister, Viktor Orbán, has announced that his country will veto any European Union sanction against Russia that affects nuclear energy, after Ukraine asked the Twenty-seven to include the Russian state company Rosatom in the restrictions. 

The Kremlin says that Biden could end the conflict quickly, but he does not.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitri Peskov has accused US President Joe Biden of having "the key to end the conflict" in Ukraine, but of not being willing to use it. 

Djokovic's father will not attend his son's semifinal in Australia.

Novak Djokovic's father has announced in a statement that he will not attend his son's semifinal at the Australian Open following controversy over images of him with fans wearing pro-Russian symbols.

London rules out substantial advances by Russian troops.

British intelligence rules out that Russian forces have made substantial progress in recent days in Ukraine given information shared this week by Russian bloggers, who speak of progress in Zaporizhia (in the south) and Donetsk (in the east).

The UK Ministry of Defense highlights in its latest report that Moscow is likely spreading misinformation in an effort to imply that the Russian offensive is maintaining momentum.

The UN nuclear agency warns of new military activities around the Zaporizhia plant.

The area around the Zaporizhia nuclear plant, in southern Ukraine and occupied by Russia since March, has once again registered numerous explosions, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the UN nuclear agency.

In this picture,

Anatolii Stepanov (AFP)

, a Ukrainian soldier in a tank near Donetsk in the east on Thursday. 

11:07

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Ukraine threatens to boycott the Olympics if Russia and Belarus participate

Ukraine does not rule out boycotting the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris if Russian and Belarusian athletes can compete, Sports Minister Vadim Guttsait announced on Friday.

The country rejects the recommendation of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) that these athletes return to competition under a neutral flag and if they meet a series of conditions, including "not having actively supported the war in Ukraine." 

“Our position has not changed.

As long as there is a war in Ukraine, Russian and Belarusian athletes should not be in international competitions, ”Guttsait denounced on his Facebook account.

"If we are not heard, I do not rule out the possibility that we will boycott and reject participation in the Olympic Games," she warned.

Later, Guttsait said that talks would start with national sports federations about a possible boycott of the Paris Olympics "in case of allowing Russian and Belarusian athletes to return to international sports stadiums."

Several countries, including Great Britain and Denmark, on Thursday opposed the IOC's initiative to seek a "path" that would allow Russian and Belarusian athletes to participate in the Olympic Games.

Russia and Belarus have been excluded from most international sporting events since the invasion of Ukraine by the Russian Army in February 2022. "No athlete should be banned from a competition solely because of their passport," the IOC estimated this week in a statement. by presenting a roadmap for the reintegration of Russians and Belarusians.

The Organizing Committee of the Paris Olympic Games has no say in the decision on the participation of Russian and Belarusian athletes.

The IOC recalled this Friday that it is the international federation responsible for each sport that currently has the "sole authority" on this matter.

(Reuters/AFP)

10:22

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Putin equates the "crimes" of Ukraine with those of Nazi Germany, on the day of the Holocaust

By

Javier G. Cuesta

from Moscow.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has equated Ukraine with Nazi Germany on International Holocaust Day.

"Crimes against civilians, ethnic cleansing and punitive actions organized by neo-Nazis in Ukraine are precisely the evil that our soldiers fought shoulder to shoulder (in World War II)," the Russian president said.

In Russia, it is forbidden by law to compare the Third Reich with Stalin's Soviet Union, and Putin has influenced this in the message published for the 78th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz extermination camp by the Red Army, an event he did not attend. invited the Kremlin. "Any attempt to revise our country's contribution to the Great Victory actually means justifying the crimes of Nazism, opens the way for the revival of its deadly ideology," Putin said.

This is not the first time that Moscow has resorted to the Holocaust to attack its rivals.

In mid-January, the Russian Foreign Minister, Sergei Lavrov, also recalled the murder of six million Jews to criticize his rivals, on that occasion the US and its allies: "Just as Hitler wanted a Final Solution to the Jewish question If you read Western politicians, they clearly say that Russia must suffer a strategic defeat."

And in May of last year, Israel summoned the Russian ambassador and demanded an apology after Lavrov himself suggested that Hitler had Jewish roots, just like Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Pictured by Mkhail Metzel, Russian President Vladimir Putin talks with Russia's Chief Rabbi Berl Lazar and the head of the Federation of Jewish Communities Alexander Boroda Thursday in Moscow.

10:07

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The Kremlin says Biden could quickly end the conflict but he doesn't

The Kremlin spokesman, Dmitri Peskov, accused US President Joe Biden this Friday of possessing “the key to end the conflict” in Ukraine, but of not being willing to use it. 

Peskov has assured in his daily press conference that Washington could end the conflict quickly if it wanted to, but instead it was supplying arms to kyiv.

(Reuters)

09:22

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Russia denies that its troops have a shortage of ammunition and missiles

Russia has denied this Friday that the troops deployed in Ukraine are experiencing a shortage of ammunition and missiles, and has assured that it has increased its production several times.

"What our enemies say about Russia running out of missiles, ammunition and other things is complete nonsense," said Sergei Chemezov, general director of the state concern Rostec, in an interview with the official Russian agency RIA. Novosti.

(Eph)

08:38

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Hungary to veto EU sanctions on Russia on nuclear power 

The Hungarian Prime Minister, Viktor Orbán, announced this Friday that his country will veto any European Union sanction against Russia that affects nuclear energy, after Ukraine asked the Twenty-seven to include the Russian state company Rosatom in the restrictions. . 

"We will not allow the plan to include nuclear energy in the sanctions to be implemented," Orbán assured in an interview on public radio.

"It is out of the question," he has settled.

Hungary has repeatedly criticized EU sanctions on Russia following the invasion of Ukraine, saying they do not significantly weaken Moscow while endangering the European economy.

(Reuters)

07:55

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Ukraine redoubles pressure on its allies to receive F-16 fighters

Ukraine wants its allies to go a step further in military aid against the Russian invasion.

In this case, more than a step, what kyiv is demanding is a leap forward that few are, for the moment, prepared to take.

Convincing Germany and the United States to authorize the export of their Leopard and Abrams heavy tanks has been a cumbersome and stressful process.

The Ukrainian authorities are now proposing to the White House that it dare to go down a path that many in Washington consider dangerous and technically too complex: supplying the Ukrainian air force with fighter jets.

Oleksiy Melnik, co-director of the Ukrainian Defense Analysis Center Razumkov, reminded EL PAÍS this Thursday that practically every type of weapon that kyiv has demanded has involved long negotiations and intense public debates before achieving it.

The case of the Leopards is paradigmatic, but so was the repeated US refusal since the start of the invasion, last February, to deliver Patriot anti-aircraft batteries: these have arrived in Ukraine this winter.

Even before this war, Melnik points out, in 2018, during the conflict in Donbas, there were already heated discussions about the advisability of handing over the Javelin anti-tank rocket launchers, with the same basic threat: that support with certain weapons will cause greater Russian backlash.

By

Cristian Segura

(Special envoy)

In the image, by

Ints Kalnins (Reuters)

, a pilot in an F-16 fighter at the Estonian base in Amari.

Read the complete information here

07:26

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Russia plans to build 25 prisons and three forced labor centers in the occupied areas of Ukraine

The Kremlin deepens control of the areas it has occupied in Ukraine and plans to weave a large network of prisons for it.

The Russian government will soon begin building 25 prisons and three forced labor centers in the four regions that it illegally annexed on September 30 - Lugansk and parts of Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhia.

One of the main priorities is the control of the population in the area, and for this reason Moscow has also officially created a new department of the Special Security Service, the FSB, in Donetsk (in the East of the country).

Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin has signed an order to build 12 penal colonies (as general regime prisons are known in Russia) in the Donetsk province;

seven in Lugansk;

three in Zaporizhia and another three in Kherson.

To these will be added four medical prisons, one for each of the regions, and two forced labor camps in Lugansk and one in Donetsk.

The Government has not yet provided data on the number of inmates that these facilities could house.

By

Javier G. Cuesta

from Moscow

In this image, from

Anadolu Agency

, the interior of a building that Russia used as a prison in Kherson province in September.

Read the complete information here

07:23

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London rules out substantial advances by Russian troops in recent days

British intelligence rules out that Russian forces have made substantial progress in recent days in Ukraine given information shared this week by Russian bloggers, who speak of progress in Zaporizhia (in the south) and Donetsk (in the east). 

"It is likely that Russian units have carried out local probing attacks, but it is highly unlikely that they have actually made any substantial progress," says the UK Ministry of Defense in its latest report, issued this Friday.

London points out that Moscow is probably spreading misinformation in an effort to imply that the Russian offensive is maintaining momentum.

07:18

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Repression and war trigger sales of the book

1984

 in Russia

George Orwell's 1984

isn't just about being spied on.

Russian President Vladimir Putin officially called his war against Ukraine a "Special Military Operation for the Defense of the Donetsk and Luhansk People's Republics," and has repeatedly reiterated that "it was clear that confrontation was inevitable."

“The only question was when […] and better today than tomorrow,” the president said in December.

His crusade against Kiev, which he accuses of being the reincarnation of Nazism itself, and the repression of his own population have caused sales of books to skyrocket with which the Russians draw some tragic parallels, such as 

1984 itself.

.

"[For the State] the enemy of the moment always represented absolute evil, and from this it followed that any past or future agreement with him was impossible," Orwell emphasized in the third chapter of his famous dystopia, a warning against repression and Newspeak that has been on hand in any bookstore for three-quarters of a century.

En una sociedad confundida por el derramamiento de sangre que tiene lugar al otro lado de la frontera, los libros de moda en 2022 han sido los de autoayuda, de comparaciones con los totalitarismos del siglo pasado y de las heridas que deja de una guerra. La librería digital LitRes, la mayor del país, ha revelado que las dos obras más demandadas fueron 1984 y el libro de autoayuda Ternura contigo mismo: un libro sobre cómo apreciarse y protegerse, de Olga Primachenko. Ambos títulos aumentaron sus ventas respectivamente un 45% y un 83% respecto al año anterior, aunque las de Orwell ya eran elevadas porque en 2021 hubo otro boom tras la detención del activista Alexéi Navalni y la posterior persecución de manifestantes y medios de comunicación.

Por Javier G. Cuesta desde Moscú

En la imagen, de Rue des Archives/RDA/Cordon Press, un fotograma de 1984, dirigida por Michael Radford y basada en la novela de George Orwell.

Lea aquí la información completa

07:10

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La agencia nuclear de la ONU alerta de nuevas actividades militares en torno a la planta de Zaporiyia  

La zona alrededor de la planta nuclear de Zaporiyia, en el sur de Ucrania y ocupada por Rusia desde marzo, ha vuelto a registrar numerosas explosiones, según informa el Organismo Internacional de Energía Atómica (OIEA), la agencia nuclear de la ONU.

Casi a diario en los últimos días y semanas, el equipo de seguridad nuclear del organismo en la planta ha estado informando de acontecimientos de este tipo a la sede en Viena, precisa la agencia en un comunicado colgado anoche en su página web.

El director general del OIEA, Mariano Grossi, sostiene que los indicios de actividades de combate cerca de la planta subrayan aún más la importancia vital de acordar y poner en marcha lo antes posible una zona de protección de la seguridad nuclear alrededor de Zaporiyia, la mayor planta de Europa. (Efe)

07:06

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Rusia y los guisantes que rebotan en la pared

La decisión de los países occidentales de enviar carros de combate a Ucrania confirma que el final de la guerra está todavía lejos. A mediados de enero se supo que en Moscú se penalizará severamente a los cientos de miles de personas que han huido del país para evitar ser movilizados o simplemente por estar contra los planes de Vladímir Putin. Lo que se quiere es castigar a quien manifieste el menor asomo de duda a propósito de las consignas del Kremlin, como esa que sostiene que no hay que dejar “tirados a los nuestros”. Javier G. Cuesta, el corresponsal de este periódico en Moscú, hablaba de “depresión, resignación y deber” para referirse a la manera que los rusos digieren lo que está ocurriendo. La venta de antidepresivos creció un 48% entre enero y septiembre del año pasado (es una pista); en diciembre, el 71% de la población seguía apoyando a Putin, según la encuesta que realiza el Instituto Levada, un prestigioso centro sociológico que el Gobierno ha tachado de agente extranjero (esta es otra).

En un reciente libro, La historia de Rusia, Orlando Figes explora los grandes mitos que han servido para construir en distintos momentos la identidad de ese país. Lo ha escrito al hilo de la invasión de Ucrania y lo terminó a finales de abril de 2022. Está pegado al presente, pero se refiere al pasado, como si escarbar en la manera en que se ha contado lo que ha sucedido desde la Edad Media sirviera para entender lo que pasa hoy. A ratos tira de consideraciones que remiten a esencias pétreas e inamovibles, a la manera del siglo XIX, y eso obliga a mantener cierta distancia, como cuando se refiere a lo que escribía el príncipe Nikolái Trubetzkoy hacia 1921 sobre la psique oriental de los rusos, esa “inclinación por la simetría abstracta, la tendencia a la contemplación y al fatalismo, la primacía de lo colectivo sobre los intereses individuales” y que le permitía explicar “la naturaleza sagrada de la autoridad monárquica y que los rusos aceptasen someterse a ella”.

Por José Andrés Rojo

En la imagen, distribuida por el Ministerio de Defensa de Polonia, tanques Leopard 2A4 polacos en un campo de entrenamiento militar en Zagan, Polonia, en septiembre de 2013.

Lea aquí la columna completa

06:59

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El padre de Djokovic no asistirá a la semifinal de su hijo en Australia

El padre de Novak Djokovic ha anunciado este viernes en un comunicado que no asistirá a la semifinal de su hijo en el Abierto de Australia tras la polémica ocasionada por sus imágenes con aficionados que lucían simbología prorrusa.

“Estoy aquí solo para apoyar a mi hijo. No tenía intención de causar esos titulares o tanta perturbación (...) Para no perturbar a mi hijo o al otro jugador en la semifinal de esta noche, he decidido verlo desde casa”, ha indicado Srdjan Djokovic en un comunicado. (AFP) 

06:55

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Leopard y calabazas en Ucrania

Volver a plantar chiles estaba en los planes de Andréi Kurkov para este año. El escritor ucranio cuenta en su Diario de una invasión que también quería sembrar calabazas en 2023 porque “en Ucrania no es posible no tener calabazas en otoño”. Pero para que la población pueda retomar esos placeres, recuperar lo cotidiano, la guerra tendrá que haber terminado, y los últimos acontecimientos hacen pensar que ese escenario está cada vez más lejos. La decisión de los aliados occidentales de enviar armas pesadas a Kiev posiblemente cambie el curso del conflicto. No se sabe si lo alargará o servirá para obligar a Putin a sentarse y negociar. El Kremlin ha dicho que este movimiento lleva la contienda a otro nivel y que los carros de combate occidentales “arderán” en Ucrania.

¿Quién pensaba que la guerra duraría un año? Dentro de un mes se cumplirá el primer aniversario. En este tiempo, los aliados han ido rebajando el umbral de lo tolerable. Hace unos meses, solo aceptaban mandar “equipos militares no letales” a Ucrania. Esta semana, después de mucho dudar, han abierto la mano a las armas más pesadas y modernas, como reclamaba el presidente Zelenski. Enviar los tanques es asumir algo desolador: la guerra va para largo y puede que lo peor esté por venir. Las tropas ucranias ni siquiera han empezado a entrenar en Alemania para aprender a manejar los Leopard. Pasarán meses hasta que lleguen a Ucrania los primeros Abrams, los carros de combate estadounidenses. Las mayores operaciones militares por parte de ambos ejércitos se esperan para la primavera.

Por Ana Fuentes

En la imagen, de Ronny Hartmann (AFP), un Leopard 2 del Ejército alemán dispara durante un ejercicio de entrenamiento en Ostenholz (norte de Alemania) el pasado octubre.

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06:26

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Los nuevos alumnos de un instituto de Torrevieja: 120 ucranios y 85 rusos

La guerra ha provocado la llegada de más de 30.000 alumnos ucranios a los centros educativos españoles. Pero también está haciendo aumentar la presencia de niños y adolescentes rusos cuyas familias no abandonan su país por las bombas, sino por las consecuencias económicas de la invasión y para evitar los llamamientos a filas. El Ministerio de Educación no realiza un recuento de la llegada de estudiantes rusos, como sí hace con los ucranios, y, pese a que el aumento se está produciendo en más autonomías, como Cataluña, solo tiene constancia del fenómeno en la Comunidad Valenciana, la única que lo ha trasladado oficialmente, después de que el número de alumnos rusos en los colegios e institutos de su territorio haya aumentado un 42% en los dos últimos cursos, hasta sumar un total de 4.321. Y siguen aumentando, explica Manuel Albadalejo, director del instituto público Mediterráneo de Torrevieja, en Alicante. “En nuestro centro tenemos 1.120 alumnos, de los cuales unos 120 son ucranianos y unos 85 rusos. Pero el número varía cada día. Ahora mismo tengo en la mano otra solicitud de plaza”, comenta. Por Ivanna Vallespín e Ignacio Zafra

Lea aquí la información completa.

26 Jan 2023 - 19:58 UTC

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Zelenski afirma que los últimos ataques rusos son solo "otro intento de intimidación que ha fracasado"

El presidente ucranio, Volodímir Zelenski, se ha pronunciado a última hora de esta tarde sobre la nueva oleada de ataques rusos que ha alcanzado varias partes de Ucrania este jueves y lo ha calificado como "otro intento de intimidación con un ataque masivo con misiles" que ha fracasado. Las tropas del Kremlin han lanzado este jueves 55 misiles y 24 drones sobre el territorio ucranio. Aunque la mayoría de ellos han sido interceptados por las defensas antiaéreas ucranias —todos los drones y 47 de los misiles—, los cohetes rusos han causado al menos 11 muertos, 11 heridos y han dañado dos infraestructuras críticas en el puerto de Odesa (sur), uno de los más importantes del país.

Durante su habitual discurso nocturno, Zelenski ha defendido que derribar los misiles supone "cientos de vidas salvadas y docenas de instalaciones de infraestructura preservadas". "Pero, desafortunadamente, es difícil brindar una protección del 100% solo con medios de defensa aérea. Especialmente cuando los terroristas usan misiles balísticos", ha lamentado el mandatario, que ha trasladado sus condolencias a los familiares y amigos de las víctimas. 

Finalmente, Zelenski ha hecho hincapié en la necesidad de combatir a Rusia con las "armas adecuadas". "Esta agresión solo puede y debe detenerse con las armas adecuadas. El estado terrorista no entenderá nada más. Cada misil ruso contra nuestras ciudades, cada dron iraní utilizado por terroristas, son argumentos de por qué se necesitan más armas. Solo las armas neutralizan a los terroristas", ha reivindicado. (Reuters)

26 Jan 2023 - 19:28 UTC

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Qué ha pasado en las últimas horas

En el 337º día de la guerra iniciada por Rusia contra Ucrania, estos son los datos clave a las 20.00 de este jueves 26 de enero:

  • Las autoridades elevan a 11 muertos y 11 heridos las víctimas de los bombardeos en Ucrania este jueves. Las autoridades ucranias han informado de al menos 11 muertos en los sucesivos ataques rusos registrados en varias partes del país, incluida la capital Kiev, así como en Zaporiyia. Al menos otras 11 personas han resultado heridas, según he informado el portavoz del Servicio de Emergencia del Estado, Oleksandr Khorunzhyi, y recoge el portal Ukrinform.

  • Kiev afirma haber derribado 47 de los 55 misiles lanzados por Rusia contra su territorio. El comandante jefe de las Fuerzas Armadas Ucranias, Valeri Zaluzhni, ha afirmado que las defensas aéreas han derribado 47 de los 55 misiles que las fuerzas rusas han lanzado contra Ucrania. Según Zaluzhni, Moscú ha usado misiles hipersónicos Kh-47 Kinzhal, entre otros modelos. Unos 20 cohetes rusos han sido interceptados en los alrededores de la capital del país. “El objetivo de Rusia sigue siendo el mismo: presionar psicológicamente a los ucranios y destruir infraestructura crítica”, ha escrito el comandante. “¡Pero no podrán con nosotros!”, ha añadido.

  • Italia solo enviará armas defensivas a Ucrania, asegura el ministro de Defensa. El ministro de Defensa italiano, Guido Crosetto, ha asegurado que su país enviará únicamente armas defensivas que permitan proteger a Ucrania de la agresión rusa y "frenar" una escalada en el conflicto. "Debemos tener el valor de tomar decisiones difíciles para evitar situaciones peores. Los primeros en querer evitar una escalada son los países europeos y de la OTAN. Todos esperamos la posibilidad de establecer una mesa de paz", ha señalado el ministro, que se desmarca así de otros países de Europa que sí enviarán tanques Leopard 2 a Ucrania, entre ellos, España.

  • Rusia declara "indeseable" el portal de noticias independiente Meduza. La Oficina de la Fiscalía General de Rusia ha clasificado como organización "indeseable" al portal de noticias independiente Meduza, registrado en Letonia, al considerar que sus actividades representan una amenaza al orden constitucional. "Se ha establecido que sus actividades representan una amenaza para los cimientos del orden constitucional y la seguridad de la Federación Rusa", ha dicho la Fiscalía General en un comunicado.

En la imagen, un tanque ucranio dispara hacia una posición rusa cerca de la ciudad de Bajmut, provincia de Donetsk, este jueves. / Anatolii Stepanov (AFP)

26 Jan 2023 - 19:00 UTC

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Defensa entregará a Ucrania los viejos Leopard almacenados desde hace una década en Zaragoza

El Ministerio de Defensa entregará a Ucrania los carros de combate Leopard 2 A4 que llevan una década almacenados en la Agrupación de Apoyo Logístico número 41, con base en Zaragoza, una vez que sean rehabilitados, según ha adelantado este jueves la ministra Margarita Robles. “Ya nos hemos puesto en contacto con la industria porque hay una serie de Leopard 2 A4 en Zaragoza que llevan en desuso mucho tiempo y vamos a ver cuáles podrían ponerse en funcionamiento para planificar esa entrega”, ha señalado, durante una visita al Instituto de la Vivienda, Infraestructura y Equipamiento de la Defensa. Por Miguel González

Lea aquí la información completa.

26 Jan 2023 - 18:44 UTC

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Canadá enviará cuatro tanques Leopard 2 a Ucrania

La ministra de Defensa canadiense, Anita Anand, ha comunicado que Canadá enviará cuatro tanques de batalla Leopard 2 a Ucrania, después de que Alemania permitiera esta semana que otros países reexportaran estos carros de combate, de fabricación alemana. "Los cuatro blindados están listos para el combate y se desplegarán en las próximas semanas", ha señalado Anand, y ha agregado que el número de tanques entregados podría "aumentar" en el futuro. "Esta donación, combinada con las contribuciones de aliados y socios, ayudará significativamente a las fuerzas armadas de Ucrania" en su defensa contra la invasión rusa. 

The Canadian contribution joins that of other allies such as Germany, which has already confirmed that it will send 14 Leopard 2 tanks, and has opened the ban for other countries that have these armored vehicles to proceed in the same way.

The United States also announced on Wednesday that it will donate 31 of its American-made Abrams cars to kyiv, but warned that they may take "many months" to reach their destination.

(Agencies)

26 Jan 2023 - 18:13 UTC

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Source: elparis

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