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CSU plans tougher asylum course: rejection, money cuts, deportations

2023-11-28T19:20:14.488Z

Highlights: CSU plans tougher asylum course: rejection, money cuts, deportations. In its new paper, the CSU calls for criminals to be deported and funds to be cut. In addition, national special paths are brought into play. Anyone who does not clarify their identity, has been rejected elsewhere or has found protection in another safe third country should be able to be turned away at the German border, says the draft. The paper follows last week's resolution on integration. Here, too, one must "demand that migrants accept our dominant culture", says Klaus Holetschek.



Status: 28.11.2023, 20:04 PM

By: Christian Deutschländer

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Wanting a stricter asylum policy: Bavaria's Prime Minister Markus Söder (left) and CSU parliamentary group chairman Klaus Holetschek. (Archive photo) © Sven Hoppe/dpa

In its new paper, the CSU calls for criminals to be deported and funds to be cut. In addition, national special paths are brought into play.

Munich – One can call this resolution resolute. The CSU sums up its new policy paper in two words: "Limit migration". Under the brief heading, there are five pages that are intended to make it clear that the MEPs are serious about a tougher course in asylum policy. On Wednesday, the parliamentary group in the state parliament will present the details. Illegal immigration is to be combated more drastically than before.

And "with all permissible state means", as the new parliamentary group leader Klaus Holetschek puts it in the draft, which is available to our editors. "Otherwise, social peace in our country will be endangered," he said, adding that aid will decrease and right-wing extremist ideas will increase. "The reception capacities are exhausted." On Wednesday afternoon, the parliamentary group is to discuss the paper. The district administrators from Fürstenfeldbruck and Dachau, Thomas Karmasin and Stefan Löwl, are invited. Both have already spoken plainly on asylum policy several times, including in Berlin.

CSU wants deportations to Syria and Afghanistan

The draft bundles controversial ideas from the Union without prose. Effective EU border management, asylum procedures at the external border, a longer list of safe countries of origin; but also the demand for the federal government to threaten main countries of origin with reduced development aid and visa withdrawal if they do not cooperate. The traffic light rejects this as counterproductive.

In the paper, the CSU calls for criminals to be deported to Syria and Afghanistan. In addition, there should be special national paths. If the EU's external border protection continues to function poorly, transit centres are to be set up at the German border. Anyone who does not clarify their identity, has been rejected elsewhere or has found protection in another safe third country should be able to be turned away at the German border. Moving refugees to secure centres in Africa (think of the failed British Rwanda model) is not part of the plan so far.

However, Holetschek is committed to cancelling the citizens' allowance for war refugees from Ukraine. They are to be provided with the lower rates for asylum seekers. For Bavaria, the CSU announces the expansion of deportation detention places. During ongoing asylum procedures and for applicants who have been rejected by a final decision, "central accommodation" is to be the rule. The payment card instead of cash has already been pushed by the cabinet anyway.

Conservative tone in new CSU paper – Söder previously brought "integration limit" into play

The paper follows last week's resolution on integration. Here, too, Holetschek struck an edgy conservative tone. He reactivated a fighting term from 2015/16: one must "demand that migrants accept our dominant culture". In particular, the guiding culture included "democracy, freedom, the rule of law, equality, tolerance and a positive commitment to our country and, of course, Israel's inviolable right to exist."

The many months in which the CSU avoided the topic of migration are over. In September, shortly before the state elections, Prime Minister Markus Söder abandoned his restraint and, among other things, brought into play an "integration limit", a variant of the former "upper limit".

When asked, Holetschek says that migration is "the dominant issue" in almost all districts. We have to have solutions. In a timely manner." That's what they were elected for. In terms of content, it will be crucial to be able to consistently reject at the German border. Politicians must "regain faith in the state's ability to act," says Holetschek.

Source: merkur

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