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Copernicus: 2023 will be warmest year on record

2023-12-06T03:26:20.299Z

Highlights: Copernicus: 2023 will be warmest year on record. December temperatures would have to be extremely cold on a global average for 2023 not to be the warmest. El Niño continues to have a warming effect, according to Copernicus. So far, 2023 is 0.13 degrees warmer than the first eleven months of the previous record holder in 2016. It is practically impossible that December will change anything, the EU's climate change service said. It had already been suggested that 2023 would set a record for global average temperatures.



Status: 06.12.2023, 04:08 a.m.

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Since records began, Earth has never been hotter than in 2023. © Thomas Warnack/dpa

It has been apparent for some time: the current year is likely to set a temperature record. Now a major climate institution is committing itself.

Reading - The current year will be the warmest globally since records began in the mid-19th century, according to the EU's climate change service Copernicus. It is practically impossible that December will change anything, the organization said. The warmest year so far was 2016.

Previously, it had already been suggested that 2023 would set a record for global average temperatures. In mid-November, the U.S. climate agency NOAA spoke of a more than 99 percent probability that the year would be the warmest since 1850. So far, however, none of the relevant institutions has made a complete commitment.

El Niño continues to have a warming effect

Samantha Burgess, deputy director of the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), pointed out in a statement that 2023 had set temperature records for several months - including November. "The exceptional global November temperatures, including two days that reached a temperature reading two degrees above pre-industrial temperatures, mean that 2023 will be the warmest year on record."

When asked, a Copernicus spokesperson explained that December temperatures would have to be extremely cold on a global average for 2023 not to be the warmest year. However, such low temperatures can be ruled out, as the natural climate phenomenon El Niño, which has a warming effect, continues to be at work. "That's why we can now say with great certainty that 2023 will be the warmest year on record," the spokesperson said.

1.46 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels

Up to and including November, global average temperatures were 1.46 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial reference period 1850-1900, Copernicus further announced. So far, 2023 is 0.13 degrees warmer than the first eleven months of the previous record holder in 2016.

"As long as greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise, we cannot expect any results other than those observed this year," said C3S Director Carlo Buontempo. "The temperature will continue to rise, and so will the effects of heat waves and droughts."

Only on Tuesday, the report on the Global Carbon Budget showed that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas continue to rise. Accordingly, they are expected to reach a peak of 2023.36 billion tonnes per year in 8. This is 1.1 percent more than in 2022 and 1.4 percent more than in the pre-Corona year 2019. dpa

Source: merkur

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