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Preysler and his Christmas, or amnesia after Boyer

2023-12-07T22:17:37.436Z

Highlights: Isabel Preysler is a woman who has built around herself an aura of mystery and fascination. The cameras have entered Isabel's house to show us what her day-to-day life is like during these endearing holidays in the Disney+ reality show. "I don't like to be bothered until I'm done eating breakfast," she says, looking at the camera with enormous sweetness. The house has a thousand things, a thousand rooms and a bunch of bathrooms, although none of them appear in the two chapters of the documentary.


The best thing about the Disney+ reality show about Enrique Iglesias' mother is the title: 'Isabel Preysler: my Christmas'. Because it is as much yours as it is someone else's to the rest. And how long it gets. And how slow everything goes


La Preysler – Presley or Presly for many Spaniards and will remain so until the end of time – is a woman who has built around herself an aura of mystery and fascination. And so it was fine as long as we knew little about her. Because we've seen a lot, but always in photos. Always on that privileged side of history, reserved for people who pose well lit and with half of the face that flatters them the most. One more of those women determined to look good with everyone, to tiptoe around all the issues, lest we screw up. Discreet, good hostesses, ideal. "I like to write and personalize gifts. If you don't, it's not the same," he says. A horror, come on.

The cameras have entered Isabel's house to show us what her day-to-day life is like during these endearing holidays in the Disney+ reality show Isabel Preysler: My Christmas. The sun rises in the late day and she shows up in a goddess dressing gown to eat what Ramona, the cook, has prepared for her. "The heart of the house," he says of her.

Isabel drinks grapefruit juice, hibiscus water and more grapefruit, this time chopped, vitamin supplements, kiwi and flax seeds for intestinal transit. She doesn't say the latter, but we all know it. A foolish father and very gentlemanly man that he faces every morning while reading the newspapers. "I don't like to be bothered until I'm done eating breakfast," she says, looking at the camera with enormous sweetness.

"Grandchildren are a very special thing, aren't they?" he says to the reporter who asks him the questions. Truth.

Next we meet Alicia, who is a secretary, assistant, her feet and her hands. He tells her that the glasses have to be checked because he doesn't want any of them "broken or chopped." The house has a thousand things, a thousand rooms and a bunch of bathrooms, according to what we have been told, although none of them appear in the two chapters of the documentary. And if Ramona and Alicia are fundamental, "the driver is very important." And Blas, with whom she does gymnastics in the mornings. "There's a very good feeling," Preysler sums up, while in his house there is not a speck of dust and outside the birds are singing and the clouds are rising.

But Isabel is smart as hungry and knows, long before Shakira, that women first and foremost bill. So while she is getting dressed, two boxes from the Rabat jewelry store appear, as well as the one who doesn't want the thing, with a pair of earrings and a ring that she will wear to leave the house. He drives around Madrid in his car with tinted windows and is nostalgic. He tells Elías about the feeling of total freedom he had when he arrived in Spain a bunch of years ago. That thing of not having a schedule, of being able to go out, of not setting foot in school because life consisted of jumping from party to party. It's a monologue that doesn't last long, because they quickly reach their destination. She calls it "Massi" because familiarity has these things, but for the rest of us it's Massumeh, a beauty center where she goes very often and is already one of the family.

Isabel Preysler celebrates Christmas with Disney+

Isabel has a group of friends (three, let's not go too far) with whom she meets to watch Christmas movies. He says it's more Paul Newman than Marlon Brando and takes the opportunity to tell them that he has a picture with him "out there" because he once interviewed him. He says it as if such a fact were just another piece of grapefruit for breakfast. One of the friends says that his favorite Christmas movie is Lovers because it takes place at that time of year and they find it very funny and choose to watch it.

Then comes the more familiar Isabel. All the sons, except Enrique, make an appearance. All very correct and much more boring than they should be when the camera doesn't focus on them. She makes clear the devotion of the grandchildren, who call her Lala. She confesses to a couple of friends that "getting older is a drag", she regrets having to give up yoga "because Miguel was in the hospital for two months".

But that's the key to this almost hour and a half. To vindicate the 26 years he spent with the super minister of finance and erase a little what was before and especially the couple that came after Miguel Boyer. That socialist gentleman who filled the house with books and they are still there, to the delight of the visitors. "It's just that we've been here for 26 years," Preysler says after a shot in which the napkins are embroidered with the initials BP, Boyer Preysler. Isabel's amnesia is so intentional that when it comes to substituting table linens, the initials that appear now are hers: IP. Because after Boyer there was nothing. Just old age, just grandchildren, just nostalgia for what was. We will always have the grapefruit.

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Source: elparis

All news articles on 2023-12-07

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