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United States: Tornadoes kill six people, leave thousands without power

2023-12-10T12:38:29.496Z

Highlights: Severe storms and tornadoes in the U.S. state of Tennessee killed at least six people. The storms severely damaged structures and homes, felled trees and broke power lines. In Middle Tennessee, no tornadoes had been recorded in a decade. The storm line continued into Alabama, where. 25,000 homes were already without power by noon on Sunday, according to Power Outage."This is a sad day for our community. We pray for those who are injured, who have lost loved ones," Montgomery County mayor says.


In Middle Tennessee, no tornadoes had been recorded in a decade. The storm line continued into Alabama, where


Severe storms and tornadoes in the U.S. state of Tennessee killed at least six people on Saturday. "At this time, we can confirm that three people have died, two adults and one child, as a result of the tornado that touched down this afternoon. In addition, 23 people were treated at the hospital," Montgomery County said via Facebook. Three other deaths were reported in the Nashville suburbs, the country music capital's emergency management office said.

The National Weather Service had issued an emergency warning for tornadoes Saturday afternoon, just hours before they made landfall. The storms severely damaged structures and homes, felled trees and broke power lines in their wake.

8:31pm CST #SPC_MD 2315 , #alwx #mswx #lawx, https://t.co/1BNrKBeRrJ pic.twitter.com/y8P72NJdH6

— NWS Storm Prediction Center (@NWSSPC) December 10, 2023

By 21 p.m., more than 150,000 homes were without power in Middle Tennessee, a part of the state that hadn't been swept by tornadoes in a decade. According to Power Outage, as of noon on Sunday, 48,800 homes have no power, including 21,400 in Sumner County and 13,600 in Montgomery County.

"Maria and I pray for all Tennessians who were impacted by the tornadoes that swept through the state tonight," Gov. Bill Lee said in a social media post Saturday night. "We mourn the lives lost and ask that everyone continue to follow the advice of local and state authorities."

Maria & I are praying for all Tennesseans who have been impacted by the tornadoes that swept through the state this evening. We mourn the lives lost & ask that everyone continue to follow guidance from local & state officials.

— Gov. Bill Lee (@GovBillLee) December 10, 2023

"This is a sad day for our community. We pray for those who are injured, who have lost loved ones, and who have lost their homes," Montgomery County Mayor Wes Golden said. Montgomery County, where Clarksville is located, has a population of more than 220,000. A school and a church have been opened by the Red Cross to shelter people in need of help or unable to return home.

Homewood right across from Waldrop Stadium... video from Paige Lessley pic.twitter.com/rSASfyxBD2

— James Spann (@spann) December 10, 2023

Local authorities have urged people to stay off the roads while emergency services are still at work. Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts declared a state of emergency and imposed a curfew Saturday night, which will continue Sunday night from 21 p.m. "It is necessary for the health, safety and well-being of the community," he said in a statement.

The line of storms moved overnight toward Alabama, with wind gusts reaching 95 km/h where they damaged roofs, uprooted trees and knocked out power. By noon on Sunday, 25,000 homes were already without power.

Source: leparis

All news articles on 2023-12-10

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