The Limited Times

Now you can see non-English news...

The colossal novel by Sara Barquinero, a Nadal Award between the 'thriller' and the 'western', the dark side of Bill Gates and other books of the week

2024-02-24T05:02:59.515Z

Highlights: 'Babelia' experts review the titles by Sara Barquinero, César Pérez Gellida, Hans von Trotha, Tim Schwab, Eugenio Fuentes, Barthélemy Amengual and Nicolás Sesma. Los Escorpiones is a colossal novel by the writer from Zaragoza, a billet of 800 pages. Pollak's Arm tells the story of Ludwig Pollak, a renowned antiquarian and art advisor, best known for finding the lost arm of the Laocoön.


'Babelia' experts review the titles by Sara Barquinero, César Pérez Gellida, Hans von Trotha, Tim Schwab, Eugenio Fuentes, Barthélemy Amengual and Nicolás Sesma


“Two things happen,” says essayist and literary critic Nadal Suau in his review of

Los Escorpiones

, by Sara Barquinero: “the first, that I believe in the book to the point of applauding.

The second, whether or not it convinces each one (the consensus, what a suspicious destiny for a work), its solidity is impossible to ignore.”

This is how forceful the expert is with the new work of the writer from Zaragoza, a billet of 800 pages where the least thing is its thickness and the most important thing is its literary quality.

A novel of novels destined for “inevitable success.”

Another notable book is

Bajo Tierra Seca

, the recent Nadal Prize winner written by César Pérez Gellida.

It is a crime novel, and therefore what better way to analyze it than our expert in the genre, Juan Carlos Galindo, who finds in this narrative large doses of

thriller

with a historical setting and

rural noir

, with an ending of well-told action and violence, western style.

And with a character that grows throughout its pages, love.

“A novel ending in the best sense of the word,” Galindo concludes.

For its part,

Pollak's Arm

,

by Hans von Trotha, tells the story of Ludwig Pollak, a renowned antiquarian and art advisor, best known for being the person who found, and gave to the Vatican Museums, the lost arm of the famous sculptural group of the

Laocoön

.

A good narrative with an already known ending: Pollak was murdered in Auschwitz, like so many thousands of Roman Jews.

Other books reviewed this week are

The Problem with Bill Gates

, by Tim Schwab, which attacks the American magnate and philanthropist, raising doubts about the good intentions of his charitable acts, aimed, according to the author, at obtaining even more power;

The Underworld of the Heart

, by Eugenio Fuentes, an essay on the crime novel that, according to the writer Leonardo Padura, author of our review, has been erasing the limits that separated it from other genres in a permanent transfer of themes and stylemes;

A life confined in the cinema or the failure of Jean Eustache

, by Barthélemy Amengual, which analyzes the life and work of the director of emblematic works such as

Numéro zéro

(1971) or

The mother and the whore

(1973);

and

Ni una, ni grande, ni libre

, the interesting analysis of Francoism carried out from Grenoble by Nicolás Sesma, whose most important thesis is that this dark period in the recent history of Spain was only possible because it did not depend on a single man and was more well a regime, like all dictatorships, not of voters but of selectors;

“people whom you select to be part of the power, to whom you have to offer a sufficient part of the pie and to whom you have to control so that they do not threaten you.”


You can follow

Babelia

on

Facebook

and

X

, or sign up here to receive

our weekly newsletter

.

Source: elparis

All news articles on 2024-02-24

You may like

News/Politics 2024-03-07T05:16:56.904Z
Life/Entertain 2024-03-12T12:43:10.426Z

Trends 24h

Latest

© Communities 2019 - Privacy

The information on this site is from external sources that are not under our control.
The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.