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"I have to push my limits every day": Savas Coban runs 5,000 kilometers unaccompanied through Peru

2022-12-05T13:32:57.808Z

"I have to push my limits every day": Savas Coban runs 5,000 kilometers unaccompanied through Peru Created: 05/12/2022 13:54 By: Nico-Marius Schmitz Through the desert of Peru: Savas Coban. © ravir film/ Jonaus Haubold Once across the land of the Incas. That's what Savas Coban (29) has decided to do. The extreme athlete from Hamburg wants to run an ultramarathon every day for three months thro



"I have to push my limits every day": Savas Coban runs 5,000 kilometers unaccompanied through Peru

Created: 05/12/2022 13:54

By: Nico-Marius Schmitz

Through the desert of Peru: Savas Coban.

© ravir film/ Jonaus Haubold

Once across the land of the Incas.

That's what Savas Coban (29) has decided to do.

The extreme athlete from Hamburg wants to run an ultramarathon every day for three months through all of Peru's climate zones.

Munich – Once across the land of the Incas.

That's what Savas Coban (29) has decided to do.

The extreme athlete from Hamburg wants to run an ultramarathon every day for three months through all of Peru's climate zones.

A total of between 4,000 and 5,000 kilometers, packed only with the bare essentials and unaccompanied.

Desert, rain forest - and then the Andes with the highest mountains in Peru should also be conquered.

We catch up with the personal trainer early in the morning, just before his next run through the heat.


Savas Coban, how did you become an extreme athlete?

Sport has always been the most important part of my life.

An outlet in difficult times.

I only discovered extreme sports late.

I rode my bike from Hamburg to Seville quite spontaneously.

I had the crazy idea and just started cycling six days later.

This trip was so much fun.

I realized that I can push my limits.

Nobody can stop me.


How did the idea of ​​running through Peru come about?

So far I've only ever been to Europe.

I looked at the world map and wanted to go to an exciting place.

Peru is so diverse.

The last two weeks I've been running through the desert, there are still mountains with mountains over 5000 meters high and the rainforest - the perfect challenge.


You've been on the road for two weeks now.

Your first impressions?

In Peru you walk from one place to another.

In between you won't find anything for 60, 70 kilometers.

No gas station, no restaurant.

I don't have a team behind me, I'm all alone.

I carry everything I need with me in a running backpack.

I start running at six in the morning and am then usually on the road for twelve or 13 hours.

That can sometimes be 80 kilometers in one day.

I often end up somewhere in the middle of nowhere.

I've slept in the desert with a hungry stomach and dehydrated.

I burn 6000 calories a day, I've already lost several kilos.


That shouldn't be the only problem.

You have to be extremely careful with the water here.

I just brushed my teeth and immediately realized something was wrong.

I then had gastrointestinal symptoms and felt really bad.

Nevertheless, I still ran that day in the afternoon.

My shoes are already completely worn out.

It's like walking barefoot.

I have an open wound that needs regular cleaning.

But first I have to find a shop where I can buy sports shoes ... It's not that easy in the small towns.

I've had numerous burns on my skin.

But that doesn't stop me.

I carry out my mission.


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How do people in Peru react to you?

In the small villages there are residents who have never been anywhere else, have never seen anything else.

When I talk to them, they don't quite understand what I'm doing here.

They always ask me where my bike is.

A lady asked me: What can you win here?

After two weeks I noticed again how incredibly privileged we live.

There is a lot of poverty here, toilet paper is a luxury good.

It's a dry region, you can't flush the toilets with water.

I'm a vegetarian, so people always give me funny looks.

Just yesterday I was sent out of a restaurant because they didn't want to prepare dishes without meat.

I don't look so fresh anymore.

The shoes are dirty, sometimes I stink too.

People quickly mistake me for a homeless person.

When I go to a restaurant, they ask me if I really have any money with me.


What do you think about during your runs?

I'm a real daydreamer.

Every day I have to push my limits, fight every day.

I picture myself arriving back at the Plaza de Armas in Lima.

That always gives me goosebumps.

And since I'm always hungry, I already have a list in my head of what I'll buy when I'm back in a German supermarket - German bread, Kellogg's, vegetarian gummy bears.


But the rainforest and the Andes are still waiting for you.

I've already been warned about mosquitoes.

Then there are the poisonous snakes.

I don't even want to talk about the Jaguar (laughs).

In addition, the humidity is very high, which makes walking even more difficult.

The jungle is so sparsely populated.

Can I always get food and water?

In the mountains I have to acclimatize quickly, make sure I don't get hypothermic and always stay dry.

These will be extreme conditions.

But I made a conscious choice to do so.


Interview: Nico Marius Schmitz

Source: merkur

All sports articles on 2022-12-05

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