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A movie rescue: a climber saves the life of a jumper hanging from his parachute 25 meters above the ground

2022-12-13T22:41:07.625Z


The American River Barry frees the victim, who was trapped and unconscious after crashing into a wall and being suspended from a rock, in Utah (United States)


In the US town of Moab, Utah, various extreme sports coexist on Western movie sets.

In a place where, not so long ago, the Indian people roamed freely through huge deserted spaces dotted with whimsical sandstone towers, climbers, mountain bikers and base jumpers are now cited.

In such a wild theme park, rescue services work hard, but they are not always the first to respond to an incident.

On November 26, local climber River Barry, 30, was unhooking from her

pick-up

his mountain bike when he attended an Australian (name withheld) participate in the Turkey Boogie base jumping festival.

The jumper accelerated his fall as much as possible before opening his parachute, but nothing went as it should.

Instead of flying away from the wall, it seemed to suck him in: a couple of seconds later, he slammed into it, plummeting.

Then the first miracle occurred: the parachute fabric got caught on a rock ledge, preventing it from crashing into the ground.

River Barry wondered two things: how long would the fabric last without tearing?

And how long would it take for a rescue to take place?

So, she showed up in the

parking lot

Justin Beitler, friend of the victim, asking for climbing equipment.

River Barry not only had rope, two harnesses, and two sets of rams for climbing fissures in the rock, but she offered to go with him.

Upon reaching the bottom of the wall, it turned out that Beitler had barely any experience as a climber, so Barry decided to take the lead.

And the second miracle happened.

A rectilinear fissure led directly to the victim, hanging 25 meters above their heads.

“I can scale that,” Barry said, convinced that her experience would get him out of trouble.

"It's as if he didn't think and just acted," she would later admit to the local press.

The victim was limp, unconscious, and Barry could see blood splatter on the rock.

He may have been lifeless.

There was no sign of any rescue equipment to be seen, so Barry strapped on the self-protection pieces of his harness, strapped on the rope, and, belayed by Beitler, began to climb a fissure never climbed before.

At one point, the fissure proved too wide: Barry didn't have such large pieces to protect himself, but she decided to continue, buoyed by the prospect of adequately protecting again a few meters above.

Then, the victim woke up, began to moan and shake: now the fabric could tear and her wounded man could fall on top of her.

Barry concentrated on calming the injured man, freeing one of her legs from the parachute cords, and busied himself with setting up a solid anchor to support their weight.

Just in case, he rode a double.

He kept repeating to himself, as if it were a mantra, that he had to ensure safety, not rush, make sure that each step taken was effective.

He cut the parachute cords one after the other until he could feel the transferred weight of the casualty on his harness.

The belayer lowered them both to the ground, hugged her and said: "Thank you for saving my friend."

The rescue services, which that day attended three base jumping accidents, arrived just at that moment to evacuate the injured man to the hospital, where he is recovering favorably.

He cut the parachute cords one after the other until he could feel the transferred weight of the casualty on his harness.

The belayer lowered them both to the ground, hugged her and said: "Thank you for saving my friend."

The rescue services, which that day attended three base jumping accidents, arrived just at that moment to evacuate the injured man to the hospital, where he is recovering favorably.

He cut the parachute cords one after the other until he could feel the transferred weight of the casualty on his harness.

The belayer lowered them both to the ground, hugged her and said: "Thank you for saving my friend."

The rescue services, which that day attended three base jumping accidents, arrived just at that moment to evacuate the injured man to the hospital, where he is recovering favorably.

River Barry, at the height of the injured man, maneuvers to rescue him.

Had River Barry not mediated, the rescue services would have had no choice but to drop from the top of the wall (450 meters), in a performance that would have taken hours.

Surely, the injured person would have died.

“I'm grateful to have been there, and to have been able to do my part of the job,” Barry explained to the local press.

“That day I understood the fragility of the human being and the ability of people to do something without thinking about the consequences.

The mind, body and soul have a great capacity to come to the aid of those who need it, ”she concludes.

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Source: elparis

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