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Draw Draw: "Ted Lasso" was a sweet dish that in the second season becomes a saccharine attack - Walla! culture

2021-07-23T05:12:41.110Z

After a first season with a perfect structure, "Ted Lasso" returns with a difficult task ahead of her: to create a sequel to her sweet story, this time with almost no conflicts at all.



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Draw Draw: "Ted Lasso" was a sweet dish that in the second season becomes a saccharine attack

After a first season with a perfect structure, "Ted Lasso" returns with a difficult task ahead of her: to create a sequel to her sweet story, this time with almost no conflicts at all - everyone loves each other, everyone gets along with each other.

Although the season is indeed having a hard time finding its way, it is still hard to resist

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  • Ted Lasso

  • TV review

  • Apple TV Plus

Ido Yeshayahu

Friday, July 23, 2021, 00:00

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Trailer "Ted Lasso" Season 2 (Apple TV Plus)

"Ted Lasso" is facing a problem.

The infrastructure of the first season put a counterweight to the fact that all the lovers of Apple TV Plus comedy, including me, indulged in it: its niceness.

The basic goodness of the series came across a few more vital human emotions, which prevented it most of the time from becoming a puddle of overly sweet syrup.



As you may recall, American football coach Ted Lasso (Jason Sodeikis, who also created the character as well as the series with Bill Lawrence) came to Richmond, a London suburb who just did not like him, and even beyond.

The local community that cursed and cursed him on the street, in the pub and in the stands, the local journalists doubted him, the players he coached did not understand him, and of course, the principal who hired him, Rebecca Walton (Hannah Wooddingham), did so in the first place with the goal of failing and destroying the club.

The disgruntled Rebecca - rightly so - after her divorce, also bullied the group's media chief, Higgins (Jeremy Swift);

At the same time, there was no harmony in the locker room - the brilliant and arrogant footballer Jamie Tart (Phil Dunster) felt elevated from the rest of his teammates, including former star Roy Kent (Brett Goldstein, one of the series' writers).




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Human connections have been and remain the central issue.

Hannah Woodingham, "Ted Laso" Season 2 (Photo: Apple TV Plus)

By the end of the first season, "Ted Lasso" had realized its obvious premise: everyone - including the viewers - had melted before the charm and sincere heart of the series' protagonist.

Rebecca was exposed and recovered.

The rivalry in the locker room ended even earlier - Jamie returned to the team from which he was loaned, Manchester City, while Roy was injured at the end of the season and had to retire for good.

Although the team lost in a tense game to Manchester City and relegated, the game was never the main interest in "Ted Lasso", but the human connections.

In this respect the extension, like the structure of the whole season, was perfect.

Emmy voters also thought so and gave her 20 nominations for the award at the upcoming ceremony - a record for comedy in her first year.

She will probably also rake in a large portion of these awards, including for best comedy.



But this is where the problem begins.

The second season of "Ted Lasso" finds itself in a whole new place, devoid of conflicts and obstacles almost completely.

Everyone loves each other, everyone gets along with each other.

Inevitably, it detracts from the series.

The very cohesive idea behind it, the one that made the first season successful and complete, unraveled and struggling to re-crystallize over the eight episodes (the first of which airs today on Apple TV Plus, the rest on a weekly broadcast, and all were sent in advance for review).

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Talking too much.

Jason Sodeikis, "Ted Laso" Season 2 (Photo: Apple TV Plus)

This loss of road is noticeable in full force already in the first and strange minutes that open the season, when a bizarre Pendel accident leaves its mark on the mind of one of the players. It seems like such a blatant, arbitrary and mostly not funny attempt to create drama out of nothing. The rest of the season may not be that puzzling, but throughout it is simply uneven. Suddenly the multiplicity of her characters is noticeable, and the plot arcs of some of them are hasty, superficial and unreasonable.



Jamie is probably the main victim of this problem. It starts at the beginning of the season, when it turns out that he has decided to leave Manchester City - one of the best teams in Europe, the finalist of the 2021 Champions League - in favor of a hormonal reality show. The engineer is a screenwriter who is transparent about where he is aiming. Knight (Nick Muhammad), who became a coach at the end of the first season, is also someone whose character has a hard time adjusting his character - on the one hand he is insecure and on the other hand a character who delivers amazing moments in their wickedness, ones that look out of place in a series as heartfelt as

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The new psychologist is in no hurry to fall for Ted's charms.

Sarah Nails, "Ted Laso" Season 2 (Photo: Apple TV Plus)

But most of the time, the main trouble in season two is the lack of balance: like a dessert whose sweetness was perfect and then suddenly turned into a powerful saccharine attack with caramel sticking to the teeth - culminating in a Christmas episode that would not embarrass the sticky Hallmark movies. Most of the time the attempts of the second season to create a contra are not successful but seem forced and uneven - as in the cases detailed above - or wasted. This is the case with the new psychologist, Dr. Sharon Fieldstone (Sarah Niles, "Destroy You," "Catastrophe"), who arrives to help after the Pendel incident. Ted discovers that she is in no hurry to fall under his spell, and he himself is not very fond of psychologists. Still growing out of their squeaky relationship, the series' attempt to avoid a rerun of the first season seems to push the Doctor to the margins most of the time and leave its character fairly flat.



The imbalance is evident even in the character of Ted, who often loses himself and those in front of him in idle swans that are supposed to be funny but they are not really.

This happens already in the first episode, at the beginning of Ted's "girls' conversation" with Rebecca, and several more times throughout the season.

That is, the jerky is expressed not only in a distorted drama, but also in a comedy that is often quite weak.

It was only after a few episodes that I suddenly laughed out loud, which made me realize that it hadn’t happened in a while.

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We have not yet reached the good end.

Brett Goldstein, "Ted Laso" Season 2 (Photo: Apple TV Plus)

The good news is that despite the problems, "Ted Lasso" still exhibits moments of refined pleasure and inspiration throughout the second season. At one point Ted tells his actors about his "romantic comedy" theory: Even if the situation is bad right now, it means you're still in the middle of the movie, that you haven't reached the happy ending. This is a Torah that is of course a candle to Ted Lasso's feet from the beginning, but this time it is also full of tributes to romantic comedies, whether through conscious use of the genre's specific clichés or explicit tributes to classics like "Love is the whole story" and "Notting Hill" ".



After a faltering start, "Ted Lasso" manages to reach a point similar to the one we knew last season, and then it's great again, at least for a while. So she makes it clear that the squeaks are not a complete loss of the mojo, and that what we loved about her was not lost. Ted himself, too, though less funny and more reliant on his sticks, gains a refinement and deepening in his character: the distance from his son and country begins to give him their signals, creating fissures in his eternal wall of positivity. In fact, the series wisely clarifies, this is exactly what it is: a wall. There is also an not very healthy element to the thing that has conquered us so effectively.



Therefore, as in a successful romantic story, it's hard not to love "Ted Lasso" despite his flaws. Once in a while she exhibits another moment full of humanity, evil and human love. One that restores the belief in the basic goodness of humanity and the tremendous impact that a simple human connection can have. One that even the cynics in the cynics will not resist. In these moments it is clear why it is still essential in our lives and why we fell in love with it in the first place.

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Source: walla

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