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Two kills a month: How to prevent rechargeable batteries from catching fire? - Walla! technology

2021-10-25T11:02:34.931Z

The recent cases of battery flare-ups and deaths in a fire have given us an unpleasant reminder of the dangers of rechargeable batteries that we all use from smartphones, through computers to cars.



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Two kills a month: How to prevent rechargeable batteries from catching fire?

The recent cases of battery flare-ups and deaths in a fire have given us an unpleasant reminder of the dangers of rechargeable batteries that we all use from smartphones, through computers to cars.

This will take care of the batteries and prevent disaster

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  • Electric Bicycle

  • battery

Yinon Ben Shoshan and Niv Lillian

Monday, 25 October 2021, 13:39 Updated: 13:56

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(Photo: ShutterStock)

Lithium-ion batteries are one of the great inventions of the last century.

The process that allows them to be built was discovered back in the 70's, and over the years they have been improved and refined, and have become perhaps the most common type of batteries in the world that drives almost anything electric you use - from your smartphone, laptop, tablets, electric bikes to electric cars Like Tesla.



Lithium-ion batteries, by and large, are considered safe, but if damaged they can pose a danger of fire and flare-up as they discovered very unpleasantly for Galaxy S7 owners at the time who suffered from a series of defective batteries, and unfortunately, this month also two teenagers with lithium-ion battery Their electric scooter caught fire, causing a life-threatening fire - along with 34 more deaths in a fire in recent years, according to pre-child safety organization data.

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Two killed within a month (Photo: Flash 90, Miriam Elster)

Do not say "it will not happen to me"

, because God forbid if you do, you could be caught in a life-threatening fire.

Take care that it does not happen and accept responsibility.

Here are some important rules, tips and explanations on how to handle rechargeable batteries in any device you have:



"It is recommended not to treat the battery rudely, not to cause it to bump, and not to charge the battery with chargers that are not according to the manufacturer's instructions," says Dr. Malachi Nokd of Bar Ilan University. Also, do not store the batteries in place at high temperatures.

If you touched the battery and felt it was hot, you should take it to a specialist for testing, "explains Nokd. The



rule of thumb is: Be nice to your batteries. - They will serve you faithfully, and now we will go a little deeper into the thickness of the beam:

Be nice to your batteries (Photo: ShutterStock)

Do not overcharge them

- Smartphones and other devices on the surface have built-in protections against overcharging, and they should stop charging when the battery is full. But for example, someone who plays with the software that manages his scooter to "get more performance out of it" may also disrupt the charge control, or in rare cases, may fail the charge controller.



In any case, when charging a device with a large battery such as an electric scooter - do not leave it unattended and do not put an electric scooter to charge at night and go to sleep. Be vigilant, and keep an eye on the charge. If there are signs of extreme warming or smoke rising from the battery - turn off the power immediately and move away from the area.



Do not use batteries or chargers that have not been approved by the manufacturer

- many are tempted to buy from Chinese sites very cheap chargers or cables, which are unable to carry or produce well the steady current that a battery needs to charge - and these become a fire hazard to themselves - and the battery.



Be sure to use only original batteries and chargers from the manufacturer, and if you have already gone for alternatives - then well-known brands that meet recognized standards (for example, smartphones and laptops have a standard of the USB manufacturers forum, known as USB-IF and have their own logo), and approved by the manufacturer Your original equipment.



A punctured, wet battery or one that has received a strong blow is a danger

- did you get on the sidewalk with the scooter and the battery took a nervous blow? Did your smartphone fall and be hit hard or did you fall into the water? Do not ignore it, it can be dangerous.



Shock-absorbing batteries may warp, swell, or ignite. In such cases, have the device and its battery checked by a licensed technician. On smartphones and laptops with an internal battery, if you see swelling on the back of the device, or a color change in the case - turn off the device immediately and take it to a technician. Similarly, a battery or wet charging contacts may cause a short circuit that will also cause the battery to ignite. If your device gets wet and is not water resistant by the manufacturer's definition - also, turn it off immediately and take it to a technician for inspection.



And by the end of the section, the worst thing you can do is puncture the battery, because of the chemical reaction with water or with air, which can lead to a rapid flare-up. If it happens to be hit by a sharp object like a knife, and you see smoke starting to rise from it, or smell a strange odor - move away from the area immediately.

Ensure proper temperature, and a ventilated area

- as mentioned, your batteries also do not like extreme heat or cold.

Always make sure to charge your batteries at an average temperature, and make sure the area is well ventilated while charging.

It is also recommended to remove the smartphone from its rubber shield while charging.



Do not expose the battery to extreme temperatures

- Continuing from the previous section, do not expose your batteries, even during use, to extreme temperatures.

For example, when driving, do not leave your smartphone on the car dashboard directly under the windshield - the battery may only heat up from exposure to the heat of the sun coming through the windshield and catch fire.



In short, take good care of your device batteries and they will serve you well and for a long time, instead of exploding on you.

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Source: walla

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