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"From Our Perspective": The American version of "On the Spectrum" has no chance of being as special as it is - Walla! culture

2022-01-22T21:02:11.662Z

It is possible that in the absence of a point of comparison, the weaknesses of "From Our Point of View" would have been less jarring to Israeli eyes. Maybe those who watch it without knowing the work that gave birth to it will love it more



TV

"From Our Perspective": The American version of "On the Spectrum" has no chance of being as special as it is

It is possible that in the absence of a point of comparison, the weaknesses of "From Our Point of View" would have been less jarring to Israeli eyes.

It can be estimated that those who watch it without knowing the work that gave birth to it, will experience many of the feelings that were the lot of the viewers in "On the Spectrum".

And again, these would mean that you have to spend for these processes

Ilan Kaprov

23/01/2022

Sunday, 23 January 2022, 00:01

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Trailer for the series "From Our Perspective" (As We See It) - "On the Spectrum" (Amazon Prime Video)

Israeli series that are American-adapted are no longer in the new line, but even after all these years, and after successes like "Homeland", "Euphoria", "In Treatment" and "His Honor", it is still difficult to suppress curiosity.

To what extent is the remake based on the original?

Did he just adjust the plot to the new place and time or did he really change everything?

Does it retain the original tone that initially made Vertex Overseas decide to adapt the series?



These doubts are even stronger when it comes to a marvelous series like "On the Spectrum," one of the best on local television ever (and the one we crowned here as the previous decade series). On Friday, the version of Amazon Prime Video (which of course is also available in Israel, including Hebrew translation) came up under the name "From Our Point of View" (As We See It). Like the original she follows the experiences of three twenty-something roommates on the autism spectrum (played by Rick Glassman, Sue Ann Payne and Albert Rotkey), who take their first independent steps in their lives trying to find love, make friends, work and generally grow up. In light of their situation they are accompanied by Mandy (Susie Bacon, "13 Reasons", "The Secrets of Easttown", daughter of Kevin Bacon and Kira Sedgwick), a guide who helps mediate the world for them and vice versa.




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Unnecessary softening of the piece.

"From Our Perspective" (Photo: Amazon Prime Video)

On the adaptation trust Jason Catimes, who is familiar with the subject of Asperger's - his son has the syndrome, and he has already dealt with the subject in one of his previous series, "Full-Time Parents."

Even before that, Katimes had also created the TV version of "Friday Night Lights," so he no doubt knows how to create a sensitive and delicate drama.

Indeed, "from our point of view" is made up of the right components.

Culinary paraphrase: She has the quality tomato sauce and the crunchy dough and the cheese and the toppings - they all stand on their own, but somehow their connection does not end with the pizza that stands in line for her, unless it's the turn for the frozen products at the supermarket.



It starts with things that do not even directly relate to the work itself.

The name "From Our Perspective" indicates more than anything the series' distrust of its viewers, or its ability to convey the message.

In contrast to "on the spectrum", a concept that manages to be both universal and specific (we are all on the spectrum, and not in vain. After all, the work focuses so much on what is considered "normal"), "from our point of view" nails it with a five-pound hammer - and adds color Of the word "we" when the title appears on the screen, just in case we still do not understand.

This nuance is repeated time and time again in the series, in a kind of sin that accompanies quite a few American adaptations: over-explanation.

A kind of unnecessary softening of the work, which prevents it from reaching the heights of the one on which it is based.

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The beating heart of the series.

Susie Bacon (right) with Sue Ann Payne, "From Our Perspective" (Photo: Amazon Prime Video)

One of the great virtues of "On the Spectrum" was the sensitive and authentic writing of Dana Idisis. And while "From Our Perspective" adopts almost one-on-one the profile of the protagonists (a computer expert with Asperger whose directness makes it difficult for him in society, a young man longing to fall in love and a good-natured guy with mediocre performance trying to perform basic daily activities), the result feels much less effective. Thus, in contrast to Zohar (Naomi Lvov) who just wants to kiss already, Violet from "From Our Point of View" commits sexual harassment of a foreign man in her first scene in the series. Even if the situation itself is not unfounded, this extremism is indicative of impatience and trust. In "On the Spectrum" we waited seven episodes until the moment when Zohar gets entangled, and this construction created a nerve-wracking and unforgettable moment - which does not exist here.



This rigidity in writing is repeated throughout the entire series, as in a situation where Harrison (the least functional young man in the gang) suddenly breaks into everything we knew about him, gets out of his house, rides a bus and enters a mall - all to meet a big-breasted fitness instructor.

These small nuances make the long-term difference between the works: "on the spectrum" is honest while "from our point of view" is didactic.

The first one wants to be seen with a loved one, the second one looks like a series presented during education.

The fact that "from our point of view" also puts clichéd motifs into this cauldron, such as romantic twists that can be seen from a mile away - certainly does not help her in this matter.

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Occasionally a beautiful and exciting moment strikes.

"From Our Perspective" (Photo: Amazon Prime Video)

And after all that, "from our point of view" is definitely not bad. From time to time a beautiful and exciting moment strikes her, one that stems naturally from her wonderful heroes (the three main actors are themselves on the autism spectrum), and paints the world in new and original shades. As in "On the Spectrum", this time too the strong moments are the ones that make the familiar equation: it is precisely the "non-normative" that reveal the hypocrisy and evil of the "ordinary". Eight episodes of less than 40 minutes also play in favor of the series, making it a soothing binge for those who need a break from the intensity of the routine. Much of this refinement is to the credit of Susie Bacon, who plays Mandy, the trio's caretaker, and is the beating heart of the series. The point of connection between the "normal" and the "abnormal".



It is possible that in the absence of a point of comparison, the weaknesses of "From Our Point of View" would have been less jarring to Israeli eyes.

It can be estimated that those who watch it without knowing the work that gave birth to it, will experience many of the feelings that were the lot of the viewers in "On the Spectrum".

And again, these would mean that you have to spend for these processes.

The big difference lies mainly in the long run: three and a half years have passed since the broadcast of "On the Spectrum" and it still vibrates the heart and mind every time she and her protagonists are mentioned.

"From our point of view," it seems, will not be able to produce this long-term effect.

It's another nice series that could have been a lot more than that.

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Source: walla

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