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Traffic errors: ten rules that don't even exist

2022-09-25T02:52:36.895Z

Traffic errors: ten rules that don't even exist Created: 09/25/2022, 04:45 am By: Simon Mones Numerous traffic errors are common among motorists. But why are they wrong and which rules really apply? Nothing works on the road without rules. The Road Traffic Act (StVO) regulates what is permitted or forbidden. But despite driving school and driving license test, numerous traffic myths persist ab



Traffic errors: ten rules that don't even exist

Created: 09/25/2022, 04:45 am

By: Simon Mones

Numerous traffic errors are common among motorists.

But why are they wrong and which rules really apply?

Nothing works on the road without rules.

The Road Traffic Act (StVO) regulates what is permitted or forbidden.

But despite driving school and driving license test, numerous traffic myths persist about rules that in reality do not exist.

Traffic errors: ten rules that don't even exist

The mistakes made by drivers range from the overtaking ban on buses with hazard warning lights to the minimum speed limit on the motorway.

It is also not entirely clear to everyone what cyclists are allowed or not allowed to do.

That's why we solve ten traffic errors and explain what's right.

The StVO applies in a parking lot, but nothing necessarily means right before left.

©Panthermedia/Imago

Many drivers mistakenly assume that right before left always applies in parking lots.

Although the StVO applies there, that does not mean that right always comes before left.

“It applies when the lanes are clearly recognizable and marked as roads.

But not if the parking lot is a large area with parking bays and the lanes are only used for finding a parking space and for maneuvering," explains the ADAC on its website.

Motorists must be considerate of each other and, if in doubt, agree on a show of hands as to who drives first.

If it breaks anyway, the liability is usually shared.

Traffic errors: There is a minimum speed limit on the Autobahn

Another traffic error is that there is a minimum speed on the German autobahns.

However, this is wrong.

However, it is correct that only vehicles that can drive faster than 60 km/h due to their design are allowed to drive on the Autobahn.

A joyride with the e-scooter is therefore prohibited.

How fast you drive is ultimately up to each driver himself - depending on personal skills, weather and traffic.

"The limit is where others are willfully hindered by slow driving," emphasizes the ADAC.

But you shouldn't drive too fast either, because if there is a speed limit, there is a risk of a hefty fine.

Catalog of fines: what fines traffic offenders have to reckon with

View photo gallery

Another autobahn myth says that you can use the hard shoulder in a traffic jam to drive to the next exit.

This is not only wrong, but also expensive.

The hard shoulder is reserved for breakdown vehicles, whoever uses it in a traffic jam must expect a fine of 75 euros and a point in Flensburg.

The use of the emergency lane is only permitted if it has been explicitly approved by the police or the signs "Use the hard shoulder".

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Traffic mistakes: rescue route does not have to be formed immediately

Traffic error number four says: The rescue lane only has to be formed when the emergency services arrive.

But then it's already too late.

Even in traffic jams or slow-moving traffic, the emergency lane must be formed.

“Cars in the left lane then drive to the far left, vehicles in the right lane to the right.

In the case of three-lane motorways, the lane is formed between the left and middle lane," explains the ADAC the procedure.

Anyone who does not form a rescue lane faces a fine of 200 euros, two points in Flensburg and a month's driving ban.

Another error concerns the so-called zipper method.

It is often assumed that you have to merge in as early as possible, but exactly the opposite is the case: the lane change only takes place immediately before the bottleneck.

In this way, the area should be used optimally so that backlogs do not get any longer.

Traffic errors: Buses with hazard warning lights may not be overtaken

Incidentally, the assumption that buses with the hazard warning lights on may not be overtaken is also wrong.

This is only the case when it approaches a stop.

As soon as this is stationary, overtaking is allowed – but only at walking pace.

A rule that also applies to oncoming traffic.

As long as a bus is still driving with its hazard warning lights on, you are not allowed to overtake it.

(Iconic image) © Gottfried Czepluch/Imago

The rear fog light should not simply be switched on when visibility is poor, as many drivers think.

“It may only be activated when visibility is less than 50 meters in fog.

Then it is also forbidden to drive faster than 50 km/h,” writes the ADAC on its website.

However, there is no obligation to switch on the rear fog light.

If you drive with rear fog lights in good visibility conditions, you risk a fine of 20 euros.

Also widespread is the assumption that you can park indefinitely if the parking meter isn't working.

Parking is then free, but only with a parking disc with the arrival time and in compliance with the specified maximum parking time.

Traffic errors: cyclists are allowed to ride the wrong way around on one-way streets

However, the traffic errors do not only affect cars, there are also some false assumptions in relation to cyclists.

It is often assumed that cyclists are allowed to ride in the opposite direction to a one-way street.

However, this is only permitted if it is permitted by the additional sign "Cyclists free".

"When entering the one-way street, drivers can tell that a cyclist is approaching them by the blue and white sign 'One-way street' with the additional sign Rad plus two opposite arrows," explains the ADAC.

Sometimes there are also additional lane markings.

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In addition, it is often assumed that there is only one fine for riding a bike while drunk.

But there is also the risk of losing your driver's license.

Because: Anyone caught with 1.6 per mille or more commits a crime.

"From this value, there are also concerns about the suitability to drive motor vehicles - regardless of whether the person concerned was traveling by bike or car," emphasizes the ADAC.

The driver then goes to the medical-psychological examination (MPU).

If he does not pass this, the cloth is gone.

Source: merkur

All tech articles on 2022-09-25

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