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"I should have let someone else answer the question": The series that has a hard time overcoming the scandal - Walla! culture

2021-04-11T15:02:03.318Z

Filming has been halted following the corona, series creator Joss Whedon has left it because of the hard evidence against him - but after all and despite everything, "Women of the Never" airs tomorrow. In the interview, the stars of the series in question try to deal with the scandal behind it, and talk about its feminist statements.



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"I should have let someone else answer the question": The series that is having a hard time overcoming the scandal

Filming has been halted following the corona, series creator Joss Whedon has left it because of the hard evidence against him - but after all and despite everything, "Women of the Never" airs tomorrow.

In the interview, the stars of the series in question try to deal with the scandal behind it, and talk about its feminist statements.

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  • Joss Whedon

  • Women of the world never

  • HBO

Avner Shavit

Sunday, 11 April 2021, 00:00 Updated: 00:21

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Trailer for the series "Women of the Never" (HBO)

The past year has been rocking for the entire TV industry, but another series has suffered more than most: "Women of the Never," which airs tomorrow (Monday) Bite, Hot and Cellcom TV at the same time as the weekly broadcast in the United States, and it happens after storms from different directions.



One direction, of course, is the corona: the stars of the series say that filming began in July 2019. The epidemic led to a long hiatus, and they returned to filming only in November 2020, and were required to start from that point after a forced and unconventional break.



A second direction is related to the identity of the creator of the series - Joss Whedon, who was previously an idol thanks to "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and the "Avengers" movies, but recently moved to the villain's box, after more and more evidence of forceful, sexist and racist conduct was published. Towards Gal Gadot, with whom he collaborated in the "Justice League."



The flames around Widon intensified during filming, and he was fired from the series in the midst of production, which does not change the fact that he is its creator and director of three of the episodes in the first part of the season, and especially not the imprint left on the final result.



In an attempt to tackle the problematic legacy, HBO has announced an unusual move: the first season will be divided into two parts, six episodes each, and Widon's name will only appear in the first part.

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"When it comes to the heart of the family, it feels the same."

Rochelle Neil in "Women of the Never" (Photo: HBO)

Of course, Widon also did not participate in the international media day held at Zoom in honor of the series' rise.

He was not there in his body, but he was certainly there in his spirit, and of course the very mention of his name was embarrassing.

When the question arose, Nick Frost volunteered to answer, perhaps because he is one of the most senior and well-known on the cast, most of whom are anonymous.



"Josh had to leave," he says.

"It's always weird when someone leaves like that, but that's what we do - move on. He left behind an amazing team."



"How do you say? You need an entire village to raise a child, and you need an entire village to create a series," says young actress Rochelle Neil, one of the discoveries that adorn "Women of the Never".



"There have been so many of us, and we're still here. When it comes to the heart of the family, it feels the same, because we need a village, and our village is still growing ... Oops, Nick, I should have let you answer and that's it."



"I tried to help you," Frost says in response.



"If you throw a lifeboat in my face, I'll miss it," Neil responds, and her laughter hides behind him the discomfort she and the other actresses have to deal with.

"Maybe it's me, maybe it's an Irish thing, maybe it's me because I'm Irish."

Anne Skelly (Photo: John Philip)

Beyond all the upheavals and scandals, there is the series itself.

Like many series nowadays, it is also periodic;

Like many period series, it also takes place in Victorian London, but this time the plot depicts an alternative reality in which a group endowed with supernatural powers operates.

Most of its members are women from the lower classes.

Their leader is Emilia, who is endowed with prophetic ability.

On her side is a penance, which in turn honored her with extraordinary energetic abilities.



Emilia is played by Laura Donnelly and Penance Ann Skelly.

Both are Irish actresses who have already done quite a few roles in film and television, but this is their biggest production to date.



"We first met in a joint reading of the script, to see if we had chemistry or not," Dolney says.

"Sometimes you can get along with someone alive, but it does not pass on the screen, and I think I was lucky that Anne Skelly was the one who came into the room that day. The fact that we were both Irish helped chemistry, and also the fact that each of us is quite similar to the character she plays, which also makes the dynamics Between the characters and the like. "



"The character I play is really, really similar to me," Skelly adds.

"Her sense of humor, the joy of life she shows even in the face of terrible situations - maybe it's me, maybe it's an Irish thing, and maybe I'm like that because I'm Irish. So far I'm mostly had the opportunity to play tragic characters, so it's nice to play someone with humor."

"In the past the suppression systems were much clearer and more extroverted above the surface, and today the forces are more hidden."

Laura Denley (Photo: GettyImages, Dave Hogan)

On the face of it, this is a "periodic" series.

To what extent do you think it is relevant today?



Anne Skelly: "Period drama allows you to look back and see what has changed and what else needs to change. It is clear that we have come a long way, and the legacy of the Victorian and patriarchal period is still evident. I can personally testify that if you are a young woman and have expertise in any field Because you are not a man. "



Laura Donnelly: "Both then and now there is oppression against women and other vulnerable groups. The difference is that in the past the oppression systems were much clearer and more extroverted above the surface, and today the forces are more hidden. And yet, even today there is systemic misogyny and systemic racism."



To what extent do you think a popular series can or should carry social flags?



Ann Skelly: "My goal is to entertain, and entertainment in itself is a very important thing, but if the series can provide any social statement, it's a great bonus. The idea that television can change or inspire is a wonderful thought for me."



Laura Donnelly: "I hope the series is entertaining and sweeping, but it also has a relevant social statement for me, and I'm proud that the series can offer it."

It seems that they are good friends even outside of photography.

Anne Skelly and Laura Donnelly in "Women of the Never" (Photo: Keith Bernstein / HBO)

As you mentioned, you are both Irish.

Two years ago, after a long struggle, Ireland repealed the strict anti-abortion laws.

Can you talk about it?



Ann Skelly: "A lot of my friends were active in the law abolition movement, and put all my energy into it. I was very inspired by it. One of the people who excited me the most was my grandfather, a devout Catholic who changed his position and supported the law repeal. I was also moved by many Irish people. Living outside the country took the trouble to visit it especially to vote in the referendum that led to the repeal of the laws. Most of all, I was impressed that a lot of men enlisted in our struggle. True, in recent years we have discovered that many men have done and are doing terrible things, and I still believe most men support gender equality. See it. "



Laura Donnelly: "I support the woman's right to do whatever she wants with her body. I support it every hundred percent and unapologetically. I think the series illustrates one thing: women, or any other group, can fight for their rights, but to change something it takes Recruit also the people who have power, which is mostly men. Following some shocking assaults and murders, we now have a lively discourse about the security of women on the streets at night. Why should it be a struggle of women? It should also be a struggle of men. It's a female issue, it's a human issue, and I wish the series would open this conversation. "

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Source: walla

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