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It's Not the Age: How to Talk to Teenage Kids After School | Israel Hayom

2023-12-04T12:28:15.365Z

Highlights: It's Not the Age: How to Talk to Teenage Kids After School. Teens tend to be less open to their parents than children at younger ages – but that's not fate. There are ways to build a healthy relationship with your child even at a foolish teenage age. Here are some tips, aided by Bard, on how to talk to teenagers after school: Approach them with affection and curiosity. Be patient, offer gentle encouragement and don't take their silence personally. Building a strong foundation of trust will encourage them to tell you things when they need you most.


Teens tend to be less open to their parents than children at younger ages – but that's not fate. There are ways to build a healthy relationship with your child even at a foolish teenage age. Here's how to do it


The teenage years can be a whirlwind of new emotions, anxieties, and experiences. As parents, navigating these turbulent waters can be challenging, especially when it comes to communication. But developing true communication is essential to building trust, offering support, and fostering strong relationships with our teenage children. The question of how to talk to them occupies many parents, especially how to talk to them when they return from school in an unknown mood. Here are some tips, aided by Bard, on how to talk to teenagers after school:

1. Approach them with affection and curiosity.
Teens crave true connection and understanding. Instead of launching a barrage of questions, smile at them and make sure to give them a warm welcome. Ask innocent open-ended questions that invite them to share their experiences, such as "How was your day?" or "Was there anything interesting you learned today?"

2. Listen actively and without judgment.
Give your teenage child the feeling that you really want to hear his thoughts and feelings. Maintain eye contact, set aside distractions and avoid interruptions. Pay attention to both the words they choose and the nonverbal cues, and ask clarifying questions to show that you are involved.

3. Avoid 'lectures' or preaching.
Teenagers are often sensitive to criticism and 'lectures'. Instead of dictating, offer advice and support in a way that allows them to make informed decisions on their own. Focus on understanding their perspective and proposing collaborative solutions.

4. Respect their autonomy and privacy.
Although it's natural to want to know everything, respecting adolescents' boundaries is critical. Avoid snooping on their personal lives or demanding information they're not comfortable sharing. Give them space and time to process their experiences and come back to you when they're ready.

5. Be patient and understanding.
Communicating with teenagers can be a two-way street full of potholes. Sometimes they will seem withdrawn or resistant to any communication. Be patient, offer gentle encouragement and don't take their silence personally.

6. Focus on building trust and connection.
Open communication is based on trust. Be available for calls, even if it's just for a few minutes. Share your own stories and experiences, and show genuine interest in their hobbies and passions. Building a strong foundation of trust will encourage them to tell you things when they need you most.

7. Make it a regular habit.
Talking after school doesn't have to feel like a chore. Incorporate this habit into your daily routine, whether it's a brief conversation at dinner or "talk time" before bed. This consistency will create a safe space for them to listen openly and feel supported.

8. Be open to feedback and adjust your approach.
Remember, communication styles can be different. Ask your teen for feedback on how they prefer to communicate. Are they more comfortable with short, casual conversations, or do they prefer regular, longer "meetings"? Be flexible and adapt your approach to their preferences.

9. Rejoice with them in their successes and offer support in the face of challenges.
Be their biggest cheerleaders! Show joy at their accomplishments, big and small, and offer encouragement through their struggles. Knowing that you are there for them in any situation, happy or challenging, will strengthen your relationship and provide them with the confidence to navigate life's ups and downs.

10. Remember, you are not alone.
There are resources available if you find yourself struggling to communicate effectively with your teenage child. Don't be afraid to ask for support from family, friends, counselors, or online communities. And don't hesitate to seek help if you need it.

Talking to teens after school can be a rewarding experience. By approaching them with warmth, respect, and an open mind, you can create a safe space for them to express themselves, feel valued, and know that you are always there for them. Remember, communication is an ongoing journey, and a strong relationship with your teenage child will last a lifetime.

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Source: israelhayom

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